DIY Forum

 

Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:13 am
Visit Thermo worx


Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]




 

 


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Painting my new render!
PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:49 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:42 pm
Posts: 2
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Hi

I am currently in the process of having the full front back and side of my end Victorian terrace re rendered with sand and cement render and have a few questions...
1. what is the best masonry paint to use?
2. do you think this is something we could do ourselves?
3. does it require any seal or preparation?

I'm trying to decide whether or not to get the professionals in? Or whether i could possibly do it? Its a big renovation so the money is getting tight, trying tot cut back where possible.

Thank you in advance!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on DeliciousShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 9:57 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:36 am
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 0 times
I always use sandtex masonry paint, I would say it's a job most people could tackle themselves, just get a good roller with a proper masonry sleeve and brush of course.
I would recommend leaving it for a few months before painting as the new render will just suck the paint in.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 8:06 am 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 7:18 am
Posts: 3027
Has thanked: 657 times
Been thanked: 343 times
I use Weathershield masonry paint, but Sandtex is also good. don;t be tempted to buy a cheap masonry paint as you generally get what you pay for.

You'll need to water down the first coat, probably 20% water, because the render will be highly absorbent. This is called a "mist coat". The usual practice is: one mist coat followed by two coats of full strength paint.

Contrary to Ianrs2k's advice, waiting a few months won't make any difference to how the new render sucks the paint in; that's what the mist coat if for. However, make sure the render is fully dry before painting.

It is quite a big job for a novice. I don't know the size of your house, or if there are any complications (e.g. lots of windows to cut in around, or working over a lean-to shed, and stuff like that), but for a "standard" semi of normal height and no obstacles to me putting my ladder up, I would allow one day for each coat, so three days for the whole job, so I would charge approximately £480 plus paint for the whole job. It might take you more than three days plus you'll need to buy the equipment, and are you happy work at height off a ladder?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:30 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2017 5:42 pm
Posts: 2
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
I have got the scaffold still up, so that allows me access to all the house and plan on getting the whole family involved to get it done (some of them have done bits of outdoor paint before) I'm pretty hands on and love to try any bit of diy so seeking as much advice as possible


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 5:37 pm 
Offline
Troll Headbutter
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 8:20 pm
Posts: 8050
Location: On top of a mountain, in the long grass.
Has thanked: 553 times
Been thanked: 1040 times
I couldn't let my family touch a paint brush for my house. At least not on my own property. I could only imagine what horrors I'd have to endure after the scaff tower came down. I'd end up having to move house or re-paint.

BG

_________________
Arguing with a woman is like reading a Software Licence Agreement.
In the end, you ignore everything and click "I agree".


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 6:02 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 7:18 am
Posts: 3027
Has thanked: 657 times
Been thanked: 343 times
Quote:
I have got the scaffold still up, so that allows me access to all the house and plan on getting the whole family involved to get it done (some of them have done bits of outdoor paint before) I'm pretty hands on and love to try any bit of diy so seeking as much advice as possible


You know what to do from my reply above. The scaffolding will make it a lot easier, but the family won't. If you want it to look good, do it yourself. Get the family to help by making you cups of tea, handing you bottles of beer (once you're off the scaffolding!), make you sandwiches, etc. If you do it yourself you'll a) have massive satisfaction and b) be the hero of the family. If you involve the others, you'll spend more time supervising them and correcting their mistakes than you will if you do the whole thing yourself.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 7:27 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:04 pm
Posts: 7299
Location: Fife
Has thanked: 921 times
Been thanked: 1651 times
You'll be able to tell when the render is dry when it changes colour. It'll get noticeably lighter after a week at this time of year.
I used dulux weathershield on my house,still looks good after 4 years. Make sure you get the trade version and not the retail stuff from b&q.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 3:08 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:36 am
Posts: 10
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Tom d'Angler wrote:
I use Weathershield masonry paint, but Sandtex is also good. don;t be tempted to buy a cheap masonry paint as you generally get what you pay for.

You'll need to water down the first coat, probably 20% water, because the render will be highly absorbent. This is called a "mist coat". The usual practice is: one mist coat followed by two coats of full strength paint.

Contrary to Ianrs2k's advice, waiting a few months won't make any difference to how the new render sucks the paint in; that's what the mist coat if for. However, make sure the render is fully dry before painting.

It is quite a big job for a novice. I don't know the size of your house, or if there are any complications (e.g. lots of windows to cut in around, or working over a lean-to shed, and stuff like that), but for a "standard" semi of normal height and no obstacles to me putting my ladder up, I would allow one day for each coat, so three days for the whole job, so I would charge approximately £480 plus paint for the whole job. It might take you more than three days plus you'll need to buy the equipment, and are you happy work at height off a ladder?

I was always taught and told never paint new render, wait at least 3 months and I can assure you it does make a difference


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 9:12 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 7:18 am
Posts: 3027
Has thanked: 657 times
Been thanked: 343 times
Quote:
I was always taught and told never paint new render, wait at least 3 months and I can assure you it does make a difference


What difference does it make? It won't make any difference to the absorbency of the render. Leaving it untreated for three months is likely to do more harm than good because masonry paint protects render.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:20 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:33 pm
Posts: 2842
Location: Dundee, Scotland.
Has thanked: 435 times
Been thanked: 541 times
Drying out??? :dunno:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:56 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:04 pm
Posts: 7299
Location: Fife
Has thanked: 921 times
Been thanked: 1651 times
Ianrs2k wrote:
Tom d'Angler wrote:
I use Weathershield masonry paint, but Sandtex is also good. don;t be tempted to buy a cheap masonry paint as you generally get what you pay for.

You'll need to water down the first coat, probably 20% water, because the render will be highly absorbent. This is called a "mist coat". The usual practice is: one mist coat followed by two coats of full strength paint.

Contrary to Ianrs2k's advice, waiting a few months won't make any difference to how the new render sucks the paint in; that's what the mist coat if for. However, make sure the render is fully dry before painting.

It is quite a big job for a novice. I don't know the size of your house, or if there are any complications (e.g. lots of windows to cut in around, or working over a lean-to shed, and stuff like that), but for a "standard" semi of normal height and no obstacles to me putting my ladder up, I would allow one day for each coat, so three days for the whole job, so I would charge approximately £480 plus paint for the whole job. It might take you more than three days plus you'll need to buy the equipment, and are you happy work at height off a ladder?

I was always taught and told never paint new render, wait at least 3 months and I can assure you it does make a difference


In the summer I've seen the decorators paint render after 2/3 days. However in the winter(up here anyway) it can be several weeks purely because of the damp weather. Like I said in my previous post you can visibly see if render is dry by the colour change,it'll lighten considerably when dry.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 6:06 am 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 7:18 am
Posts: 3027
Has thanked: 657 times
Been thanked: 343 times
Quote:
Drying out???


But for three months? :lol:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 


Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Hilti


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO