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PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2017 1:33 pm 
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After the house was destroyed by fire I now need to set up a new workshop, its just for hobby work, in both wood and metal, so Iam looking at the Axminster range of machines, need saws, blade and band, and one for metalwork, pillar drill, Planer thicknesser, sander belt & disc, morticer, extractor system etc, so are they any good? what is their "Jet" brand, am I better getting a combination machine although I will have plenty of space, any other makes anyone can recommend? Thanks Nos.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:38 am 
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Sorry to hear of fire damage I am sure someone who has more experience of these tools will be along soon I work on field so have different set of tools

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:56 am 
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I think multi machines are a nuisance as you are forever changing the mode for various steps in a job. I think the priority is a good table saw first then a chop saw or sliding mitre saw, a combined space saving planer thicknesser is a compromise, a router table and fixed head router to go in. A band saw is useful but not essential as is a morticer. A pillar drill also is useful as is a fixed vice. Obviously a range of power and hand tools too.

I have some of my bench tools bolted to thick ply base boards with a cleat underneath. This way I can quickly switch them onto one of my workmates as needed saving space.

The Axminster stuff is quite good and it is suitable for DIY or light trade use in the main.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 11:04 am 
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The jet stuff is well made I do have a few items inc a wood lathe

As above combo machines aren't good - built to a price meaning that do mediocre job of what there designed to do, rather than a purpose built machine designed for a set task


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 11:54 am 
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Thanks for your replies, the fire destroyed everything we got out just in time with what we were wearing, it was early evening so we did have clothes on but apart from the car keys and passport we lost it all, I had spent 12 years building the house to pasiv haus standard and was about six months from completion, but I was well insured and will now sit back and watch a new one going up with a nice workshop, but Iam so bored ::b ::b ::b Nos


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:49 pm 
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I remember you telling us at the time, it was a terrible thing to happen but thank goodness you had insurance. It does not cover the heartbreak of all your work going up in smoke but at least you can see your new home rising from the ashes. I hope it all goes well for you now :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 1:33 pm 
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In general I would always advise buying second hand since you will much higher quality for the cost.

EG: startrite bandsaw, multico, sedgwick, startrite, robland etc for table saw, planer thicknesser, morticer

Meddings for a drill

Jet machines are quite good if you want to buy new. They are at the top end of Chinese imports, but still not in the above class.



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2017 6:35 pm 
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Notch1 wrote:
EG: startrite bandsaw, multico, sedgwick, startrite, robland etc for table saw, planer thicknesser, morticer

Meddings for a drill

Startrite did make good bandsaws, but their table saws were always a bit on the light side, I felt - and after 30+ years few that I've seen for sale are in good condition. Multico made good mortisers and tenoners, as well as reasonable overhand planers (all of which seem very durable) but their saws were always a bit "agricultural" to my mind - definitely not as nice to use as the Startrites, which is probably why the Gillingham firm (Startrite) came to dominate the light saw market in the 1960s (along with Wadkin Bursgreen for the better off/light industrial user). Robland? The earlier ones from the late 70s/early 80s are downright crude and nasty, and tarting them up with a Startrite label (as happened) didn't make them any better - I'd especially avoid the SD310 planer/thicknesser which has some serious design flaws to it (and parts are no longer available). In fact the one name which shines out in that lot is Sedgwick - still going and still building fairly basic, robust kit. As for Meddings - the older drills such as the L, M, DrillTru, etc were good bits of kit in their day but many years of industrial use often shows - the later squared-off stuff is, quite frankly, really poor according to a schools techology techician of my acquaintance. I gfeel that the OP might be as well off looking for a clean Fobco Star or Ajax drill press, or possibly a Startrite Mercury or earlier (British-made) Record Power.

To the OP: Personally I'd suggest being leary about so-called "classic machines" unless you are very, very familiar with the specific machine. Back in their day some weren't very good and after 40 or more years of use (and possibly abuse) they might just be a pile of poo - and one for which spares will be non-existent. It's a bit like "classic cars". I've seen pretty much every motoring lemon I've owned over the years (from a Standard 8 to the Ford Corsair) be described as "classics" (including in the motoing press of modern times) when in reality many were horrific, underperforming, poorly-built, rot boxes....... But that's a different thread.

The question of combis is interesting. They are compact, but even when you have separate motors changing function will cause you to lose your fence settings, etc (with the possible exception of Felder, Hammer and Knapp). As lomng as you are a logical and ordered person, this won't matter, but if you aren't beware! A lot of older combis are not what I'd call accurate or user friendly; in that I'd include Robland/Startrite, Lurem and pretty much all the stuff made here. The Italian stuff such as the older SCMs and Minimaxes are just plain counterproductive and not set out at all well. The first half-decent combis available were probably the Swedish-built Lunas, a sort of Felder before Felder grew to their current prominence. All I;'d say to anyone interested in a combi, see if you can get to "test drive" one for real. Awkward controls, inadequate rip fences, lack of decent scales, operations such as planing interfering with sawing (especially ro on Italian stuff) and poor extraction are all potential pitfalls

In terms of the kit to get, it sort of depends on what your budget is and what your aims are. Without knowing those it's a bit difficult to suggest specifics, although in general terms for woodworking the list might include:

1. Tilt-arbor table saw
2. Drill press
3. Planer/thicknesser (or possibly just a thicknesser if you buy-in planed timbers)
4. Chip collector/dust extractor

with more specific stuff coming afterwards.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:21 am 
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Thanks again, I will not bother with a combi I have plenty of room, a lot of the websites, are geared to commercial machinery nearly all 3 Phase. As said its just a hobby, I would prefer to buy new, Axminster do a six machine trade package for £6000, so within my £8000 limit, there is one company MW Machinery which may be Ok Startrite Industrial band saw/ Planer thicknesser/315mm Table saw, Robland dust extraction system, Jet Belt-disc sander/ Floor pillar drill, and a Sedgwick chisel morticer, however this lot is over budget by £2000, so if you have any other ideas or website to recommend I would be grateful. Nos


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am 
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You could try Scott and Sargeant.

They do their own branded iTech range, which is similar to the Jet I think

https://www.scosarg.com/itech-01446-315 ... ench-51679

The record 350 bandsaw gets quite good feedback on some forums

If you can stretch to a sedgwick planer thicknesser -maybe Scott and Sargeant may have one used, you wont be dissappointed and the resale value will be good, they are very sought after.

I would suggest you ask about your choices on the workshopkuk forum since that is dedicated to woodworkers and there are plenty of members using exactly this sort of prosumer level woodworking machines, so you are likely to get more feedback and advice.


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