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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 12:49 am 
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I've realised after much reading the reason the joints cut-outs I've attempted are crap is because a Router is the tool to do the job. It would also seem to be the powertool I've always admired from afar.

So now I need to buy one and make a decision, but no matter how much reading I do I'll never have the 'hands on' experience of those who have used one.

I seem to favour (from reading reviews) that Hitachi make good routers?

Then others here have posted the Dewalt DW626 is a fine machine.

My thinking is to get a reasonably good machine circa £200. Have a liking for this HITACHI M12V2 have read good things about it but it’s a tad beyond my budget. Am I aiming too high? That will cope with the heavy work of work tops and tough, deeper jobs and supplement it with an older more refined 400 to 700 watt 1/4" light weight for more delicate work.

So first things first, I do enjoy good quality power tools and tend to buy beyond my use, in that I'm not a professional but I know the better the tool the better the job, as long as I don't interfere too much.

If you had that sort of money what router would you buy and why?

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 1:17 am 
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what do you want to do

I have a trend T3, recomended by panlid, great little 1/4 inch router and a steal at only £25

I also have a DW624, which is a less powerful version of the 626, 624 is 1600W, 625 2000W, 626 2300W

Now I can cut worktops fine with the 624, yes more power would be nice but it works fine imo


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 8:54 am 
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Hi Tim,
Thanks for taking the time out.
Got 2 work tops in the near future also have a couple of flats and you never know when they will need something fixing (kitchen wise) in fact one needs a new hob and I'm sure it'll be a different size.
I'm using worktop as the 'heavy' guide and that's why I wouldn't want a less powerful machine that wouldn't cope. I've picked up that around 2000 watt and a 1/2" collet are pretty much the target and from what you're saying that seems about right.

My thinking is get probably new for the heavy weight and maybe second user for the lighter, like Makita 3601b 930 watt but light weight and from all reviews, at it's release, good machine like the Bosch POF 400A they’re both old but your getting Bosch and Makita quality for around £20 even with new bushes still a good deal?

I'm happy shopping at my favourite store (fleebay) for an older lightly used machine that will get me quality but not particularly 'fashion' colours.

My previous hammer drill, was at least 15 years old Elu (can't remember the model but back then £189.00 on special) I bought it after burning out a B&D, when I was building a frame in the loft space to carry 2 x 40 gallon header tanks, but that will still go through anything an SDS can but it's loud. I still have it as a back up and it mixes plaster really well.

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:15 am 
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Hi Alan,

Start with a cheap lightweight router. The learning curve is understanding feed rates and establishing a feel. Use scrap wood and run edge moulding to start with a round over bit. Move on to cutting housings, running trenches, figuring out setting up fences and how deep for each pass. Then make up some jigs and get to understand how the guide bushes work.

You can then move on to higher power routers with confidence. In my book the Dewalt 625EK is still the best for worktops, but some of these new combo machine with interchangeable plunge and fixed bases look good.

Whatever happens you will end up with a router collection and more often thatn not you will use the lightweight the most :lol: .

DWD


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:39 am 
Jaeger the Hitachi M12V2 router is £199.99 at powertools2u

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The new Hitachi range as a whole is impressive and a mate of mine who works in shop fitting swears by it and has replaced most of his machines with ones from Hitachi.

Although as DWD says the 625ek is an excellent machine as i have one myself, although it doesnt get much use when i do get it out it always gets the job done.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:47 am 
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Hello DWD,
That's kind of my thinking, as I've never used a router I'm sure I'm going to mess up big time so a lightweight cheap, not bursting me if I kill it is where I'm thinking to go and have a play or make chippings for the garden (is what I'll tell Penny)!

I was watching the guy next door use a router and worktop jig. He's a builder (or at least he tells me he is). He looked like he should have maybe taken some practice, he wasn't very confident and the gear looked new?

Keep the comments coming guys. And any sites you'd recommend for so reading, just for techniques etc, not going to become a threat to the carpenters of this world, but the chippies might have to watch out.

On the worktop jigs, is it size specific, 600mm for a 600 worktop or is the 900mm adaptable?

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That's a keen price wf9 and available in 240v too :lol:

The Hitachi does get good reviews and your friend seems to agree, anyone got any horrors, was reading reviews on biscuit jointers (I know I need to get out more) and a dewalt got mixed response for setting accuracy.
I'm trying to remove as much machine error as possible as the operator could be the biggest problem? :?

Not rushing in on this one, but next 4 to 6 weeks will have to do the dirty.

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 1:46 pm 
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If you get a lightweight then you can get a much better feel. Another point to note is the effect materials have on cutters which you can learn with a smaller unit. For example chipboard will dull a cutter very quickly. Machining hardwood will aslo show how cutters can ride over hard or polished spots and burn if they are dulling.

The big routers need both hands to steady and can take off a lot of stock in one pass. I have a fixed base router mounted in my router table and you really need a table for any serious router work such as making cabinet doors etc.

The heavy routers are fine for jig work such as worktops but unless you do these all day it probably is not worth the investment.

This is worth a read on worktop joints
http://www.raygirling.co.uk/wtjig.htm

DWD


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 2:05 pm 
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That's a lot clearer :-)

So any size should be good as long as it's not a 600 on a 900 top?

There's a bit I don't follow, I just can't get it, have read it more than once and still don't follow.

Quote:
N.B: If I am cutting a joint on a worktop that has a "free" end - for example, an "L"-shaped surface where one end does not reach a wall - I prefer to cut the joint in the end, then offer up and cut off the waste accordingly, using the router and a straight-edge clamp.

However, if you choose to use this method, make sure that you re-inforce the straight-edge clamp with a separate clamp, at least at the post-formed edge, as I've found that the rounded edge can cause straight-edge clamps to pop off easily.


Anyone help?

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 3:39 pm 
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tim'll fix it wrote:
what do you want to do

I have a trend T3, recomended by panlid, great little 1/4 inch router and a steal at only £25

I also have a DW624, which is a less powerful version of the 626, 624 is 1600W, 625 2000W, 626 2300W

Now I can cut worktops fine with the 624, yes more power would be nice but it works fine imo


as an aside

variable speed control will increase the power requirement by 20 to 35 percent for the same output
the quoted power is nearly always the input power
so an old 1600w router without speed control could suddenly turn up as 1900 to 2200w dependant on power loss

this also applies to drills saws sanders and anything with variable speed

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 6:39 pm 
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if i was to buy another 1/2" router i would go for the dewalt, probably the 625. I have borrowed tim'll fix it's dewalt 624 and it is a far, far better machine than my 1/2" bosch router.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 7:18 pm 
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stay away from the freud brand. been waiting for my piece of sh*t to break for 5 years so i can get the dewalt one.
is it really 5 years? :?

bloody hell its not that bad is it?

in fact, get the freud, a top bit of kit that has never let me down :thumbright: :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 7:23 pm 
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i keep leaving my bosch in the van in the hope it will get nicked, not even the gyppos want it :cb :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 7:54 pm 
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glad you told me this owen, i was going to look at the bosch. whats wrong with it?


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 8:24 pm 
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i have the 1300w bosch, not the 2000w. the 1300w is underpowered for worktops, and the plunge action has stiffened up, and it doesn't lock in position very well.

i'm sure stripping it down may sort out the plunge mechanism, but i can't be arsed. compared to the dewalt it feels crap to use. admittedly it was nicer to use when it was new, but it's only about 3 years old and hasn't had a hard life, so it shouldn't have deteriorated so quick IMO.


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