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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 7:47 pm 
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last time i had timber pressure treated over 10 years ago it took 6 weeks to get moisture levels right
helping my niegbour buld a summer house and told him to allow 4-6 weeks before fitting the air dried timber
he says he has been told 2 weeks with modern methods :dunno:
told him not to expect it to be ready for at least 4 or 5 weeks
have things really moved on :dunno:

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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 9:16 pm 
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I don't know about drying times although I can't see how it could change that much but modern pressure treated timber doesn't seem anywhere as resistant to rot as it used to be. For example I built an arbour with 3x3 tanilised around 25 years ago and dug it out and took it with us ten years later when we moved house ( new owner didn't want it ) and it was still like new and is still fine now but a friend put in some 6" round posts less than five years ago which are rotted through.
This whole wet timber thing reminds me of an incident some years ago. I was replacing the timberwork for lead guttering and the timber was wet when delivered. Lead federation ruling at the time was for a 3mm gap between the boards but as they were wet I put them together without gaps. Architect saw this but wouldn't accept the notion that the boards would shrink and had me take it all out and replace with gaps. So I duly did so and surprise surprise the boards shrank and left gaps nearer 12mm which I then had to put slivers into .


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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 9:32 pm 
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Might be all the global warming that's drying it out quicker these days? :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 9:53 pm 
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By the time you've finished pulling about 80 rafters up on to a scaffold you start to wonder if it's been dried at all - some of them are literally twice the weight of others.

But I don't have to do that any more..................... :huray: :mrgreen:

I do remember cutting a roof sometime back in the early 70s, it was a cold winter, the stack of timber was covered in snow when we arrived and absolutely saturated, it was also frozen solid right through to the centre, we had to take a crowbar to it just to separate the pile, and then cut it - by hand - it was that cold that when my mate decided to put a bit more set on his saw to cope with the ice he snapped three teeth off it, (no Jacksaws in those days).

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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 9:58 pm 
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Tannalised timber is no longer CCA treated, chromate copper arsenic,

its probably treated with a hint of tea tree oil these days :-)


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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 10:04 pm 
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More like they use a scented candle in a warehouse.....

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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2017 10:49 pm 
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ok can i put it another way :lol:
is anyone aware off any reduction off treatment to use times over ten years ago
or has nothing greatly changed so a 70% reduction in drying times is probably a non starter :lol:

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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 8:06 pm 
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B-A it can still come in soaking wet and the carrier used for the chemicals is still water AFAIK, so things probably haven't changed that much. We used treated timber on some of the work we did last summer and it took weeks to dry out (to the touch). The stuff we had delivered at the beginning of last year had obviously been outside because we ended up craning it off the lorry as a single lump - it had frozen that way - and leaving it to thaw out because we couldn't even pry it apart. It took about a week to thaw out sufficiently for use to break it out, which at least got me off the roof (and the howling gale there always seemed to be up there) for a while

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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 8:15 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
B-A it can still come in soaking wet and the carrier used for the chemicals is still water AFAIK, so things probably haven't changed that much. We used treated timber on some of the work we did last summer and it took weeks to dry out (to the touch). The stuff we had delivered at the beginning of last year had obviously been outside because we ended up craning it off the lorry as a single lump - it had frozen that way - and leaving it to thaw out because we couldn't even pry it apart. It took about a week to thaw out sufficiently for use to break it out, which at least got me off the roof (and the howling gale there always seemed to be up there) for a while

yes what i though :lol:
its just his attitude is "cant wait that long" so want be sure off my facts before i tell him he is not god and nature doesnt care for his shedules :lol:
at least he is going to buy a moisture meter

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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 11:32 am 
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I've also noticed an increasing amount of timber firms spraying their timber and claiming it's pressure treated. My sister went for the cheapest option on her decking a few years back and it's rotten now.

I'm not aware of any changes in tanalised timber. There's a timber yard near me, if I remember I'll ask next time I'm in but I doubt they'll tell me.


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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 1:34 pm 
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Argyll wrote:
I've also noticed an increasing amount of timber firms spraying their timber and claiming it's pressure treated. My sister went for the cheapest option on her decking a few years back and it's rotten now.

I'm not aware of any changes in tanalised timber. There's a timber yard near me, if I remember I'll ask next time I'm in but I doubt they'll tell me.

subjective really "pressure treated " is actually a wrong description
you place in a large chamber create a vacuum then atmospheric pressure forces the liquid in

you can claim its pressure treated if you use an ingredient and pressure so you can coat it with hair spray or air freshener
its words like "to preserve"or "extend the life off"or to a known standard that gives you a right to expect it to last longer

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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 9:12 pm 
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AFAIK pressure treated has always involved pressure and vacuum-treated is sold as such. Personally, I buy pressure treated stock from one of two yards where they (both) have pressure treatment vessels prominently situated in their yards. Pressure treatment is always obvious when you cross cut it - the good stuff penetrates visibly 3 to 5mm in from the surface (one reason why it's coloured? - and also why cut ends always need to be treated with "end-stop" fluid after installation).

Just for good measure, B-A, the oils used in pressure/vacuum treatment will generally cause moisture meters to read incorrectly as they change the levels of salts within the timber (and thus its' condutivity). SAt least that's what Protimeter and Delmhorst state on their tech sheets. How does your neighbour expect to get round that?

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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 10:42 pm 
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i think i have talked him into expecting a 6 week drying time :lol:
as he is a fireman he wont be ready for the planks for three possibly 4 weeks anyway
will be working on the roof noggins 60 in total this week then then boarding and covering the roof next week iff all goes well :lol:
didnt know about the salt thing will mention it to him :lol:

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