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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 7:08 am 
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I am getting a lathe and milling machine assembled. The lathe will have a 14" swing and 60" between chuck and tailstock(i.e) 60 bed with ).001 work accuracy. The lath must be able to cut threads them.TIA blueprints for such a lathe and milling machine including dimensions for tailstock, quill, ways, lead screw, compound slide etc. Does anyone know where to buy them? TIA


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 10:44 am 
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Hi,

Firstly a warm welcome to UHM and Merry Christmas. :thumbleft:

I'm a bit confused as to what you are requesting so more information please. My confusion is in you stating you are having a lathe and mill assembled in which case I would have thought you would already have all the specifications to hand but if you "Intend" to have a lathe and mill assembled then I understand better.

If you intend to have a lathe and mill assembled you state the lathe sizes regarding swing and between centres; to have a lathe assembled would be highly expensive when such lathes are available at reasonable prices through such as eBay in fact a few years ago I sold my big Colchester Triumph lathe which would have given you the capacity required. As to lathe accuracy 0.001" (a thou) is not a tight tolerance on a decent lathe in fact in my home workshop working on a poor lathe I can achieve 0.0001" (a tenth of a thou). Engineering lathes usually have a lead screw and
screwcutting as standard; I prefer a lathe with a clutch and gearbox; lathes can be set up for cutting both imperial and metric threads.

Now to the mill; do you intend to have a mill as an attachment to the lathe or a freestanding mill?

I've been involved with lathes for over 50 years and own three lathes; I'm interested in your request though and although I'm unable to offer a source of such blueprints I can certainly put you in touch with another forum who might possibly be a better place to ask for such advice;

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/

I've been a PM member for quite a while and the members are mostly professionals who regard novices and home workshops with some disdain; members tend to work in industry with up to date kit but I'm cheeky enough to push in as shown here;

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/hydrovane-6pu-compressor-problems-290649/index2.html?highlight=hydrovane+p6

During the Hydrovane restoration/repair I used my lathe to make a part for it as shown on the thread. Practical Machinist I think would possibly be the best place to ask?

Why do you specify the lathe capacity; do you have a particular job to do?

Good luck.

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 1:16 pm 
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imho unless your a skilled machinist building you own lathe/mill will be impossible due to the skills and equipment required to get anywhere near the tolerance you desire, 60" between centres is a large lathe

even skilled tool makers with 50 years experience wouldn't build there own machines

or

do you mean you need instructions for a lathe you all ready have ?

what job do you want to do ?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 3:29 pm 
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The best place for lathe specific info I found when I was looking was http://www.lathes.co.uk/

If you could be a little clearer as to what you're doing we could probably advise better :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 3:56 pm 
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Hi,

I couldn't agree more flash; to give the 60" between centers we are looking at similar to this;

[urlhttp://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Colchester-Mastiff-1400-Gap-Bed-Centre-Lathe-60-BC-supplied-with-fixed-steady-/201663098233?hash=item2ef40ead79:g:jvsAAOSwi0RXzwnL][/url]

I was trained on Colchester lathes and I shudder to think letting a novice loose on one of these which could and will drag you in after making a silly mistake killing you outright; the lathe wouldn't even slow down. I'm interested to learn the reasoning behind the wish to build such a lathe from parts after all why bother? Obtaining compatible parts would be nigh on impossible; OK lets say impossible because even if a suitable donor bed could be located long enough to give the required 60" between centers such a bed will have its own profiled ways and these profiles are not standardized in any way each lathe manufacturer adopting their own profiles; the carriage and lead screw etc would need matching; the head-stock with gearbox would not simply slip into place neither would the tail-stock in short such a lathe would be nothing more than a mongrel but as I say I don't have all the details of why anyone would wish to put their own lathe together; it's totally new to me. The only lathes I've seen built by new owners are woodturning lathes where both head-stock and tail-stock are bought then the new owner could mount both on their own wooden bed of any length they wished; if my memory is correct I think Connolly Lathes were well known suppliers?

To buy a lathe such as the Mastiff which is a huge powerful piece of kit weighing a couple of tons then attempt to add a milling machine would indicate a job of industrial proportions involving a great deal of money; such a machine couldn't be run from a 13A single phase supply in fact when I used to run lathes this size upon power being applied the lights would dim; these lathes are designed and constructed for the heaviest of turning jobs; the next step up are the "Super lathes".

I was apprenticed aged 15 but I wasn't allowed by law to operate machinery until I reached 16 and only then after I had spent 6 months at Crigglestone NCB training center in 1963; I was then allowed to operate these big machines but always under the watchful eye of the engineers. One silly mistake could result in instant death or loss of limbs; it doesn't bear thinking about; my best chum Ken France was dragged into a carding machine in the mill and killed and he was aware of the dangers involved. Just look at the chuck size; this is a very heavy lump of metal and once rotating will take a bit of stopping; the fixed steady seen mounted on the bed will need a crane or some kind of hoist in order to install it safely. Sorry if I sound negative but machinery commands respect.

May I ask what experience you have of such large lathes stefanblum; why you want to assemble such a machine and also what you intend to use such a machine for? :scratch: I know in America some guys are into big machinery but then in America they tend to have large barns and plenty of space; the way an American knocks a nail in is to crank up a big compressor and use a massive nail gun.

I'm interested in your progress Razor with your newly acquired lathe; have you got it under power yet and done a bit of turning? You'll know first hand just how much a decent lathe weighs and the space it occupies; good luck with yours; Bron and I are looking forward to seeing you soon.

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 2:11 pm 
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Hi,

I believe I slipped up in posting the eBay link to the Mastiff lathe; a member kindly let me know so fingers crossed this link will work and to make sure I'm also adding a "snip" of the eBay page; sorry for any inconvenience and many thanks to the member for contacting me;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Colchester-Mastiff-1400-Gap-Bed-Centre-Lathe-60-BC-supplied-with-fixed-steady-/201663098233?hash=item2ef40ead79:g:jvsAAOSwi0RXzwnL&clk_rvr_id=1144782995735&afsrc=1&rmvSB=true

Kind regards, Col.

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Mastiff.JPG [ 137.69 KiB | Viewed 742 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 10:12 am 
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Hi,

I thought this thread would turn into something very interesting; c'mon stefanblum why not join in after all you posted the thread and have been viewing it in the background; we don't bite and are interested in why you posted asking for such information and more importantly what you would use such a lathe for. :scratch:

I'm interested in anything to do with lathes and in over 50 years this is the first time I've come across a request for information as to how to build an engineering lathes from assorted donor parts; one reason I'm so interested is that just before retiring I actually intended to build my own "Super woodturning lathe" all the way from design to actually using it. I was so serious about this I made a wooden mould and had a pair of cast iron copies made by our local foundry costing £80 the pair these to be head-stock and tail-stock. I had access to everything I needed and at the time owned the Colchester Triumph lathe; my plan was to "fly cut" the bases then line bore to accept head-stock bearings and tail-stock barrel; bearings; pulleys; drive belts and locking rings etc I could easily scrounge free of charge at work by simply asking for them because everyone knew of my ambitious workshop activities and were only too happy to help out.

Unfortunately lots of problems got in the way and after having the castings moulded I shortly retired and although I've got rid of lots of personal family problems I don't seem to have any spare time in retirement; I gave the castings away to a friend after selling the Colchester who in turn is now suffering lots of personal family health problems so I think these two castings are destined to become paperweights.

I'm intrigued as to why you would want to go the hardest way possible stefanblum in constructing such an hybrid lathe when suitable lathes are readily available at reasonable cost; you say you are assembling the lathe; if so please enlighten us as to any progress. If I already had a mill and an engineering lathe I'm sure I could put an hybrid lathe together; it would be hugely time consuming but fun; over 40 years ago I owned a SWB land rover which had been installed with a BMC 2.2L diesel engine mating this up to the original gear box; just about anything can be done and even a lathe can be assembled from non matching parts if adapter plates and machining is carried out but it would take skill and a lot of imagination. In the pit one of the engineers used a motorcycle gearbox grafting this onto a threading machine. Below is a picture of the lathe castings I had made so making a lathe from assorted parts would be possible after all I was designing and making a lathe from scratch; a woodturning lathe I acknowledge is light years away from a metal turning lathe in design and construction but then where I'm concerned I regard nothing as impossible in fact I like to tackle such challenges just for the sheer fun of it.

Kind regards, Col.

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Lathe blank castings.JPG
Lathe blank castings.JPG [ 421.44 KiB | Viewed 619 times ]

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 5:54 am 
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Thank you for viewing my post. In reality I was looking for suggestions of purchase new vs purchase used locally vs purchase used overseas and then import vs finding dimensions and then building (cloning) from scratch. Obviously I will go with the most value for money option. A brilliant suggestion was from someone who make sure you get a lathe and milling machine that can accept er collets.



For this message the author stefanblum has received thanks - 2: james232, Retired
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 12:37 pm 
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Hi Stefanblum. If you'd tell us what you actually want the lathe / mill for then we might be able to help you more. The machine you are talking about is quite a large machine capable of working on large heavy industrial components. You then say about collets for the lathe and milling machine. You won't be using collets in the lathe on large pieces normally I wouldn't have thought. Collet chucks can be obtained and fitted to most machines as needed in any case.

If you're looking at doing smaller work or production work then you may need different (or more) machinery. Smaller machines are in general more pleasant to use for work on small components than big machines.

Do you really need the large capacity or could you contract out occasional large pieces?

You also need to think about whether you want imperial or metric machines. Also there is all the other equipment needed in a heavy machine shop, like lifting equipment, welding gear, large drill press or radial arm drill, grinders etc. etc. etc.

You'll also need to learn how to use it all safely if you don't know already. Both lathes and milling machines can be extremely dangerous if you do not understand the risks.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 12:42 pm 
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Hi,

In order to buy a new center lathe giving the size you need stefanblum it will be very expensive indeed; as will buying a new mill; I like Colchester lathes and live near the factory here in West Yorkshire;

http://www.colchester.co.uk/products/colchester-centre-lathes/mastiff-vs1800-centre-lathe/

I'm pleased to add the link above then at least you can enquire to obtain a rough idea of the price of a new lathe which will give you a bit of information to work from. Are you based in the UK or are you abroad.

Buying secondhand is the cheapest option but it can also be a big gamble as to the condition of the lathe or mill and the work both have been put to. Modern industrial lathes and mills are generally CNC type whereas older machines can be manual. If you have the work and can afford it then buying new will guarantee best quality and accuracy with a full manufacturers warranty.

Good luck in your search.

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 7:04 pm 
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That reminds me, I must get round to selling my CL500 lathe!


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