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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 7:31 pm 
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My combi drill is OTT for driving smaller or even medium screws, and frankly not that good at it. I'd fallen into using the impact driver even for small stuff, but it can be needlessly noisy even on the lowest speed, plus I miss the slip-clutch for repetitive screw-driving. So I decided to get a smaller drill/driver, specifically for light screw-driving and/or (timber) screw-hole drilling.

I chose Makita's DDF083, which has a hex chuck; it takes 18v batteries yet is light, tiny and has enough torque and power for the job I want it for. (They also do a chucked version in drill/driver and and combi flavours but these are longer, especially if you then add a hex/quick-chuck, and so IMO not so much to gain over the trade-duty combis that are only slightly bigger). It isn't a very heavy duty machine, but Makita seem to be pitching it at more than just DIY use (perhaps comparable to the 10.8v trade scene); it certainly feels very solid, so I'm hoping it will still outlast the warranty.

Here it is against my combi drill (the DCD995, which is about the same size and weight to the makita DHP481; i.e. the heavy end of the range).
Attachment:
DDF083-DCD995.JPG
DDF083-DCD995.JPG [ 95.6 KiB | Viewed 702 times ]

The DDF083 is roughly the same size as a small impact driver, which seems perfect. Obviously without the umph, but of course I've still got the impact driver for bigger stuff, and the combi for any masonry drilling which it does very well.

I'm quite surprised by how well the little DDF083 does, first trials are very promising - much more capable than the powered screwdrivers for instance. I've only tested with a few screws so far though, so time will tell. I also want to find what its sensible limits are in terms of screw size. So not much of a review so far, but I'll add to this thread once I've had more time with it. Currently the only annoyance is that there is no bit-holder (for the side of the tool) supplied with mine, which seems a strange omission for such a tool.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:16 pm 
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I was doing a stud wall this week so tried the driver out on that. It did some 6mm x 100mm goldscrews into CLS quite happily.

That isnt the type of thing I got it for, and the bigger models would be quicker. But it shows that it is more than capable for general/smaller screws. It is certainly much more convenient (than the big combi) for the smaller ones, too.

Really very pleased. The only question is how rugged it will prove to be longer term, since it is obviously intended to be light-weight.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:32 pm 
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i have the bosch 10.8v stuff
i have the impact the the hex driver the drill driver and the hammer drill and all will quite happily
drive in a 100mm screw with little difference in time it takes
i always drive on low speed and never ever use the clutch as i dont do many repetitive moves like studs
so finesse is needed rather than brute force :lol:
as an aside i have the new dewalt 996 3 speed hammer dril[massive 870w]
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DeWalt-DCD99 ... Swv3JbHlsC
l have also played with the
new 3 speed impact and they have an electronic clutch that cuts off power at the point you reach
it also reduces the power input so acts like a lower power tool

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:44 pm 
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I have switched to 10.8v for comfort and compactness, with li-ion batteries and modern motors they out perform my old ni-cad makita gear easily.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:16 pm 
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Yes it was people's reports on the modern 10.8v stuff that gave me the confidence to try this. As I understand it, it is pretty much one of Makita's 10.8v tools, but changed slightly to run on their 18v LXT batteries which suits me nicely. A small compromise in battery weight of course, but aside from that it has similar benefits.

Even so, I'm still a bit surprised (and pleased) with just how much grunt it has for a tiny light thing. They do a combi version (with a normal chuck) thats currently going for about £60 (in black for some reason), quite tempted at that price; I'd imagine it would do wall-plug sized holes into most walls.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 9:11 pm 
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other unbeliveable tools in the bosch 10.8 now called 12v that i have
is
3" angle grinder
1/4" router
jigsaw
dremill type tool
mini circular saw that will cut up to 27mm and fit in under a standard kitchen unit base at around 145mm
another useful tool is a drill with no chuck just an 6mm hex aperture
it also
has a hex drive with the pool back collar
10mm chuck
angle attachment
offset attachment
the other three can be piggybacked off the angle attachment

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 9:39 pm 
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Yes my little 10.8v combi drill is quite happy to do holes big enough for brown or red plugs in just about any wall and I have drilled up to 15mm through breeze block walls.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 10:15 pm 
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Thats encouraging. I guess we've spent so long with cordless tools being under-powered that (for me, at least) it takes some time to realise that the biggest are no longer needed for many routine jobs.

Though the online reviews don't help. Many of them seem to think that a few seconds difference in the time taken to drive a million massive screws into big blocks of wood is all we should be concerned with.. I do have the big 18v combi and impact driver as well; they are invaluable, but for 75% of the time they're also getting ridiculously OTT.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:21 am 
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It all depends on your work type really. If you are banging screws into framing all day then speed and longevity are important and take precedence over weight and size. If you are drilling holes in masonry a lot then a cordless SDS though bulky and heavy is going to be a big help.
If however you are drilling just a couple of holes each day and rarely driving large screws or large quantities then you are likely fine with a smaller kit. An extra minute drilling a hole means nothing if you only drill half a dozen a day, if you drill 100 a day then it matters.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 10:25 am 
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Yes, I agree. Personally I'm not viewing these ultra-compact things as a replacement for the bigger tools, as in my case their extra capacity is sometimes needed. But a lot of the time it really isn't, so they are quite appropriate for routine stuff (or will be, if they prove to be durable, anyway).

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:21 pm 
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I bought the Bosch blue drill driver GSR 12v a few years ago. I can't believe the torque it has and use it 80% more than any other drill driver I have.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:33 pm 
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they do tend to be a bit lower geared for example 0-400/0-1300 as compared to 0-500/0-1900 for the 18v drill so similar power but slower progress

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:35 pm 
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big-all wrote:
they do tend to be a bit lower geared for example 0-400/0-1300 as compared to 0-500/0-1900 for the 18v drill so similar power but slower progress


Yeah but the size is ideal and i don't notice that much of a difference tbh.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 2:49 pm 
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Rorschach wrote:
It all depends on your work type really....

For most of the work I do 18 volt Li-Ion and heavy-duty is really what I'm after, but recently I did some work on a modern building where it was necessary for me to lug my kit up and down many floors without the benefit of any sort of lift, and believe me carting two kit boxes, plus ironmongery 9 or 10 floors up before starting a job is really no fun.Fortunately I didn't stay with that job, but had I done so then I'd already come to the conclusion that I needed to lose some weight - in my kit. So I started to think seriously about going to 10.8/12 volt with an initial kit of brushless drill/driver, impact driver, SDS and jig saw (albeit at an initial outlay of £1000 to £1200) - all of which would have reduced the weight I was carrying by about 5 to 8 kg when you take into account the not insignificant weight of the battery packs. That's a significant reduction. I've already found that the 12 volt brushless Milwaukee SDS will happily drill most concrete and cement blocks found in modern buildings and although it is a bit slow on concrete floor slabs it does get there.

Rorschach wrote:
If however you are drilling just a couple of holes each day and rarely driving large screws or large quantities then you are likely fine with a smaller kit. An extra minute drilling a hole means nothing if you only drill half a dozen a day, if you drill 100 a day then it matters.

Yes indeed! I've found myself re-examining my choices this year and whilst the main move (for me) has been from corded to "full-size" cordless tools I can see a need to add a "downsized" kit for jobs where mobility is more important than absolute power

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2018 3:53 pm 
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Argyll wrote:
big-all wrote:
they do tend to be a bit lower geared for example 0-400/0-1300 as compared to 0-500/0-1900 for the 18v drill so similar power but slower progress


Yeah but the size is ideal and i don't notice that much of a difference tbh.

yes spot on
i can get a drill in my jeans side pocket and you cant tell its a drill

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