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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:56 pm 
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gildasd wrote:
Notch1 wrote:


110V? Isn't that used in some ungrateful ex-colonies of the Crown?

Joke aside, If I was doing demolition as a side gig with hired 150kg brutes from an angency, this would be perfect, get them by the dozen and only repair/replace when down to 2...


and every building site, ship yard and all other places like that in the country :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:25 pm 
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fin wrote:
gildasd wrote:
Notch1 wrote:


110V? Isn't that used in some ungrateful ex-colonies of the Crown?

Joke aside, If I was doing demolition as a side gig with hired 150kg brutes from an angency, this would be perfect, get them by the dozen and only repair/replace when down to 2...


and every building site, ship yard and all other places like that in the country :lol: :lol:


And has been for nearly 50 years in my own experience in heavy industry. You'd have been sacked for putting a 13A socket anywhere in the steel works, apart from offices etc.

110V centre tapped to earth, giving 55V to earth on each conductor is a lot safer than 230V, which can of course easily be lethal.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 8:36 am 
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Dave54 wrote:
fin wrote:
gildasd wrote:
Notch1 wrote:


110V? Isn't that used in some ungrateful ex-colonies of the Crown?

Joke aside, If I was doing demolition as a side gig with hired 150kg brutes from an angency, this would be perfect, get them by the dozen and only repair/replace when down to 2...


and every building site, ship yard and all other places like that in the country :lol: :lol:


And has been for nearly 50 years in my own experience in heavy industry. You'd have been sacked for putting a 13A socket anywhere in the steel works, apart from offices etc.

110V centre tapped to earth, giving 55V to earth on each conductor is a lot safer than 230V, which can of course easily be lethal.

Ok, that must be UK specific.
I'm a merchant Navy Machine Officer.
We use 24DC, 240AC, 480AC, 600AC and 6600AC. The "earth" being the ship, but usually via a cable to breakers.
The 240 is 16A but is very sensitive, jumps real fast (pulling out the plug on a working hand drill), but the others are meant to latch to prevent black outs, so are very dangerous!

I think the reason is that the portable welders, fans, etc need 16A.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 6:48 pm 
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110 volt (centre tapped) has one major advantage over 230v - if (when) some bright spark decides to stop a "sensitive" circuit from tripping (as opposed to tracking down the problem and fixing it), it can sometimes be accomplised using mechanical means, rendering the RCD inoperative, or even bypassing it. I have experienced this on a couple of German sites and the thought that you could be electrocuted because of some gang master who's in a hurry to finish a job and is therefore cutting corners is less than pleasing.

In the UK 110v has been standard practice on railways since at least the 1960s nd I've seen adverts from the 1950s advertising 110 volt kit here in the UK, so it has been around for some time

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"The person who never made a mistake, never made anything" - Albert Einstein

OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:02 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
110 volt (centre tapped) has one major advantage over 230v - if (when) some bright spark decides to stop a "sensitive" circuit from tripping (as opposed to tracking down the problem and fixing it), it can sometimes be accomplised using mechanical means, rendering the RCD inoperative, or even bypassing it. I have experienced this on a couple of German sites and the thought that you could be electrocuted because of some gang master who's in a hurry to finish a job and is therefore cutting corners is less than pleasing.

In the UK 110v has been standard practice on railways since at least the 1960s nd I've seen adverts from the 1950s advertising 110 volt kit here in the UK, so it has been around for some time

In my company we do work permits and LOTO.
Bypassing safety is a good way to get fired - never do it.
The only 110v/240v plugs are the one for shavers in the cabins.

Oh, the hammer is great, I'm surprised how smooth it is.
In fact, I first thought it was not working properly, but then tried it on a ciment kitchen cabinet base... Massacred that in short order.
I find it less tiring, if a tad less powerful, than the rental Hilti I used a few years back.



For this message the author gildasd has received gratitude : james232
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:52 pm 
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Been using for some months, works great.
They don't advertise the damping system, but it is effective.
My only small gripe is that there is no fine screen on the intake, but few machines have that.

I damaged the cable (spade slip) so I had an opportunity to look inside while rewiring.
It is made to be taken appart, no worries there, no tricks.
The conductors are all held by screws, no cheap connectors.
The trigger has a metal support and the switch itself is nice.

i am very happy with this machine so far, it makes me wonder why the rest of the range is not imported...


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