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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 11:57 am 
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I have a piece of architrave that's below the plaster by about 7mm and the skirting board sticks out past the architrave about 4mm so I plan on removing the architrave and fitting a piece of 4mm stripwood to bring it flush with the skirting then I was going to rebate the back of the architrave. The only thing I'm worried about will I have to move the door hinges and catch to make the door sit flush.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 12:32 pm 
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i would just stop the strips at the front edge off the architraves making them look a bit chunkier
moving screw holes less than about 6mm can be awkward

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 1:12 pm 
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If you are thinking about relocating the hinges outwards you'd also need to extend the door casing/linings to support them (and take the hinge screws) so plonking a bit of wood on the edge, even if glued on, is going to be weak and potentially prone to failure. In addition all the hinges and the keep will need to be removed and the recesses patched (not filled with 2-pack which invariably reveals itself or worse fails). If you seriously need that door to be flush then a better approach (on which will be sufficiently strong and not prone to failure and will be cleaner and neater in the long run) is going to be to take the door off and move the entire casing/linings to leave the door flush with the new wall surface, then rehang the door. The architraves on the other side can then be built-out. And by doing that there's no need to pull off the stop laths (which in any case might have been glued and screwed), or patch the casing, move the hinges and keep, etc. But it's still one heck of a lot of work, TBH.

Bearing in mind that the architraves will have something like a 9.5mm (3/8in) or 10mm set-back from the reveal, the door will still be able to open more than 90 degrees, but obviously you will need to prevent the door for slamming back into the architrave. The simplest and cheapest solution, as opposed to relocating the hinges, is to build-out the casing on the "flush" side with the build-out strips set-back by 9.5mm (3/8in) or 10mm and then to apply new architraves, again set-back by the same amount. That requires new architrave material, but avoids a flush joint (which invariably reveals itself subsequently by the timber swelling/shrinking differentially to the main casing/lining or even by the paint cracking). Done that way the door will also open to the same angle as previously (or just under 135 degrees).

If you really need to re-use the architrave then I'd recommend chamfering the edge of the old casing/lining and the edge of the build-out. That will give you a V-grooved joint which can be more easily be disguised with a bead of decorators caulk run down it with the thumb (to make a hollowed joint which can be quite subtle). In that case the door will not open to the same angle and will require a floor-mounted door stop to prevent the door damaging the repositioned architrave

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:03 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
If you really need to re-use the architrave then I'd recommend chamfering the edge of the old casing/lining and the edge of the build-out. That will give you a V-grooved joint which can be more easily be disguised with a bead of decorators caulk run down it with the thumb (to make a hollowed joint which can be quite subtle). In that case the door will not open to the same angle and will require a floor-mounted door stop to prevent the door damaging the repositioned architrave
I will be using new architrave but I'm not to sure what you mean by you're post. I do know what big-all is saying by stopping the strips at the front edge off the architraves making them look a bit chunkier but doing it this way it don't like right as I'm using bullnose architrave.


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