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 Post subject: How to stiffen a bolt?
PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 10:38 am 
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I have a long M8 bolt passing through a part. By putting a few turns on the bolt I adjust the parts position on the threaded stud and how it functions. I also am looking at some female cam levers that by turning the matting bolt would adjust the tension when the lever is applied. Both are simple but functional solutions to a problem but if the bolt is too loose then it can turn accidentally and loose the position it was set at so I’m looking for a way to stiffen the bolts on the thread in their holes.

Some people have suggested wax but I need something that will not migrate, something permanent and the stiffer the better.

Any ideas on a permanent way to stiffen a bolt on it’s thread?


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 11:08 am 
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Would applying a threadlocker help
https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from ... r&_sacat=0


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 11:47 am 
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Nylon locking nut?

(Its a nut but with a nylon insert to stop it coming undone)

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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 11:52 am 
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It would lock the part in place, the function of the part depends on the ability to adjust the position of the bolt. Unless there is a type of thread lock that just stiffens the fitting but I don’t know of one that dose this.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 11:56 am 
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Nylon nuts is a promising idea for the cam levers but for the part it's not a nut it's a threaded bore in a part. I wonder of there is some kind of tape that would do the same thing. Maybe PTFE plumbing tape. My concern with both of these is that after a few adjustments it would start to lock up.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 12:02 pm 
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I found some Nylon Lock Nuts and they did the job perfectly for the cam lever but the stud and the part are still a problem. It’s a M6 A2 stainless steel stud passing through a threaded hole in 13mm of aluminium.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 1:19 pm 
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Can you put a secondary locking nut on it in the form of a wingnut or similar?


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 4:12 pm 
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I had to step away for a moment. Picture 100mm M6 bolt passing through a 13mm square bar of aluminium. On one end of the bolt is a thumb wheel and on the other end a magnet. To move the magnet back and forth you rotate the thumb wheel. The aluminium bar sits roughly in the centre of the bolt.

For the cam lever the nylon is the perfect amount of resistance but for this use it could be less, just enough to let it hold it’s place when being transported for example.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 4:56 pm 
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This is what I was thinking of.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 5:21 pm 
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Yes that's it Dave. If you imagine turning the adjuster clockwise to move the magnet away from the bar in the middle the locknut would come up flush against the side of the bar and then you would be turning the bolt through the thread in the bar and the locknut but when you went to turn the adjuster counter clockwise to move the magnet towards the bar the locknut would no longer engage.

To have something like a locknut that has some thread with resistance to it do it’s job it would have to be attached to the aluminium bar and I cant think of any way of doing this. Maybe a strip of nylon could be attached with two smaller bolts above and below.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 5:29 pm 
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The nut's free on the thread. to lock it you just tighten it up against the alloy bar.
It's the old fashioned way of locking adjusters, but it works.
The alternative is to have some sort of friction device between the threaded shaft and the alloy bar. A keyed, thick washer, spring loaded onto the alloy bar with a fibre washer or similar between.
Means keying the threaded bar though.


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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 8:07 pm 
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Why not drill a series of holes in the bolt and use cotter pins to add tension ?

The other way is to create a mass of horseshoe washers and add or subtract them as needed.

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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 8:32 pm 
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A bolt with a spring ?

https://goo.gl/images/E1rQaZ

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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 9:52 pm 
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I think I see what you mean. The M6 bar dose actually have a coupler nut on the side of the thumb wheel that allows the user to mark and return to end positions.

You lost me a little with the friction device “between the shaft and the alloy bar” though. I’m not sure where you mean by between.

I’m also not sure about the cotter pins or washers. This M6 bolt needs to be free for the user to be able to screw it all the way so the end with the magnet is flush with the supporting alloy bar or all the way in the other direction till the adjustment wheel is about 20mm shy of the bar. If there are washers and pins I cant see how the threaded bar will screw through the hole.

The spring is an interesting idea though, something to put the whole thing under tension might do the job.


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PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2018 12:57 pm 
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The Nylon Locking nut has been the solution for the cam levers. The part with the threaded bar was trickier but eventually someone explained a system used by Eccentric Engineering on their Acute sharpening system.

“drill and tap a 3mm hole in the side of the square aluminium through to the m6 screw. Cut a short length, (say 2-3mm) of 2mm nylon strimmer line and put it in the hole followed by a 3mm grub screw. You can infinitely vary the stiffness of the bolt by tightening the grub screw.”

This sounds like the solution I was looking for and hopefully may help anyone who comes here after. Thanks to everyone for the advise and help.



For this message the author yadnom1973 has received gratitude : London mike 61
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