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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 1:27 pm 
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Hi Everyone

I am struggling to paint a wall using Dulux white soft sheen paint. Every time I attempt to do it, I am being left with a patchy finish. I am using a roller and painting in the same way I have for years.

Is there a certain way to roller using soft sheen? It seems that when I go to blend in the edges, it makes it patchy.

Any ideas greatly appreciated.

Rikki


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 6:51 pm 
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Leaving aside any issues with the brand of the paint ... it is about speed of painting, technique and tools. I don't really know what the problem is so here are some guesses as to how to solve it.

- Get at least as a minimum of 9" hamilton perfection medium pile sleeve (and handle as appropriate)
- paint fast
- it may help if you dilute the paint a little.

Explanation. The paint dries faster than you paint and/or you roller too much and/or you go back on areas you previously painted and/or your roller sleeve is cr@p. You must maintain a wet edge on the paint, so divide mentally the wall in a top and bottom half, start in one corner paint a meter wide of the top half and immediately the same width on the bottom half overlapping with the top, next one metre overlapping with the previous paint and so on. You don't stop until you get to a corner. Don't try to squeeze the last drop of paint from the roller, spread the paint evenly and always finish on an up or down stroke (not random horizontal strokes). You need lightish touch on the roller and keep reloading instead of pushing it more.

Paints with a sheen and the "wrong" light bring out imperfections on the walls and also highlight previous or their own orange peel.

Even if you were to paint "correctly" you may not remove previous problems just by painting alone, you may have to sand the surface.

I am a DIYer (and I avoid Dulux).


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:03 am 
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Quote:
always finish on an up or down stroke (not random horizontal strokes)


This is more important than people realise.

In my first month as a decorator, a customer asked me if I could do anything about a wall they had painted with gold shiny paint as their efforts had left it very patchy. Being new to the business, I didn't have a clue how to fix it so I called the paint manufacturer, Crown, and asked their advice. They explained how important it is to "lay off" the paint. Laying off is what OchAye is describing in the bit I have quoted. When you lay off the paint, all the molecules in the paint end up facing in the same direction so the finish looks a lot more even. I repainted the wall and laid it off as they instructed and the difference in the finish was incredible. Laying off is also necessary when painting ceilings.

Follow OchAye's suggestion and roller a 1 metre section (I do roughly three roller widths as a section), top half of the section, then bottom of the section, and then lay off the whole section. As OchAye says, you have to move fairly quickly so the paint from the previous section doesn't get chance to dry as you are rolling the next section. Rolling over drying paint is what causes most patches. I use a paint scuttle rather than a paint tray as trays hold less paint and I don't want to have to stop and refill the tray while doing a wall, especially a long one, as even a slight delay will mean the section you have just done will start to dry.

Personally, I find it easier to lay off from top to bottom as it gives me more control over the roller as it approaches the end of the stroke, and there is far less danger of inadvertently hitting the ceiling with the roller.

Avoid pressing too hard on the roller when laying off. The idea is to make the paint molecules lay in the same direction so only a light pressure is needed to achieve this.

You might find one of these handy: https://paintersworld.co.uk/products/purdy-powerlock-extension-pole-1-2ft. It allows you to work faster and more evenly as you are using two hands. they are particularly useful with slightly higher walls as you are not stretching to reach the top. Longer poles are essential for easily reaching ceilings and higher walls - in stairwells, for example - but a short pole is more convenient when painting walls in rooms where the space behind you is restricted because of furniture, etc.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:37 am 
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All good advice above although I would have to be pedantic and say that laying off is aligning the direction of the roller/brush marks so that light reflects off the surface evenly. It has nothing to do with the direction of the molecules of the paint, you can't influence something on a microscopic level like that and even if you could, the paint molecules are in a liquid suspension and are bouncing around all over the place and bumping into each other constantly so it wouldn't last. Only way to align them is to have polar molecules and a very strong electromagnetic field.

That got complicated :lol:



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:51 am 
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Thank you very much for the tips. I suspect I am over-rollering, especially when blending into the cut or each section.

I'll take these on board and see if I can improve it!



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:14 am 
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Quote:
I would have to be pedantic ...


Not at all. Your explanation sounds far more plausible.



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:27 am 
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Tom d'Angler wrote:
Quote:
always finish on an up or down stroke (not random horizontal strokes)


This is more important than people realise.


I might be being stupid. By this, do you mean one continuous rolling action from top to bottom
or
an up and down motion as you move down the wall?

ah


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:50 am 
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Another few things to watch is that you are actually applying the roller square. There is a tendency to subconsciously push a bit too hard and the roller arm can bend slightly which can leave tramlines in the finish as the roller is biased one side. This is quite common. So as above nice even square strokes and as I am a bit short sighted these days I use an LED light to check I have not missed bits which is easy to do white on white. I use a thick pile mini roller to do window reveals and awkward bits with a mini tray watered slightly. :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 5:40 pm 
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Quote:
I might be being stupid. By this, do you mean one continuous rolling action from top to bottom or an up and down motion as you move down the wall?


No question is a stupid question.

Roll a 1 metre wide section as you normally would, up and down, using a W shape, first the top half, then the bottom half, and then lay off that same section using one continuous rolling action from top to bottom so you, as Rorschach put it, align the direction of the roller mark.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:06 am 
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It's usually due to down lighting highlighting textural differences.

If the surface is a mess you are best off machine sanding the whole surface down.

I would use a fine pile roller for this on a single arm. If necessary tape off door jams so you can roller right up to the wood and remove light switches so you can get an even pile mark everywhere. You don't need to tape off everywhere just the areas which are spot lighted and show up clearly.

If the conditions are hot an dry you will also need to thin the paint a bit and keep a wet edge. Often thinning a tad is a good idea anyway to make life easier and it will lessen the texture. If you thin the paint thin the whole lot you are using in the same container to get it even.

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