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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:24 am 
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This old, unstable radiator has ripped away from the wall. As you can see, the plaster has come away and there is brick work behind it an inch under the plaster. The radiator was hooked over a metal piece which attached to a wooden board which was drilled into the wall. Is this something that can be done without professional help, or is this a DIdon't?! There is a pipe that attaches to the floor supplying the water. I didn't take a photo, but it's a thin small pipe on the right hand side and it has also bent a bit from the damage.
Thanks


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Last edited by DIdon't on Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:37 am 
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Looks like a job for a Handyman to make good and fix it with something stronger, Chemical fixings would be good.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:44 am 
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Do you think it would be an expensive job? The wooden boards basically need to be fixed back onto the wall for the radiator to be hooked on in place? It just needs to be fixed as it was, rather than being replaced with a better job at this stage


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 12:14 pm 
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No idea on cost it depends where you are as much as anything, maybe £100. ish

You can stick it back with longer screws for now, but the walls look a bit crumbly.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:02 am 
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Like scruff says, it's a job for a handyman, no 'Tradesman' would be interested!.. :wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:56 am 
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as it will be now resting on the pipes i would either support the radiator underneath
or turn off both taps 'loosen one nut on the end off the radiator empty into a bowl or dish underneath by opening the bleed valve [and closing to empty the bowl]
when empty loosen the nut the other end and lower to the floor supporting the radiator near the valves to reduce strain close the bleed valve and tighten the nuts in case off leakage
remove any loose material fill holes to flush with the surface remove the brackets
remove the wood from the brackets then affix the brackets to the wall

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:11 pm 
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Thanks for the advice everyone.. I live in London in response to the cost depending on location point. Have supported the radiator underneath and as we were lifting it water startled trickling out the sides. Turned off the valve where I could and no trickling that I could hear/see. On the other side it's a bit wet around the bottom of the pipe where it goes into the floor (there is a small hole in the floor where the pipe enters the floor).

Big-all what you were saying sounds complicated for someone who has never done a bit pf plumbing in their lives.. It seems the hardest bit will be the removing the radiator safely from the wall. Fixing the wood back to the wall shouldn't be too hard with an electric screwdriver?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:33 pm 
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the trouble you have is the radiator needs to be out off the way so you either remove it or move it out off the way by rotating on the pipes as a pivot emptying the radiator is to reduce the weight to try and avoid damage to pipes and fixing

you will need a hammer /percussion drill to re drill the holes
your better to throw the wood away and clean out and fill in several layers till flush with the surface
also iff you can move the bracket along the wall a bit it will help to find a stronger bit off wall

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 6:40 pm 
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Lots of qualified craftsmen will repair that for you. Not worth chancing a handyman, after all you could end up employing some one who was working in an office 3 weeks ago!!

I have a full work load until Christmas but if you are situated in the right part of London in relation to where I am working then I can sort it for you.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:02 pm 
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royaloakcarpentry wrote:
Lots of qualified craftsmen will repair that for you. Not worth chancing a handyman,



Not even if they're a member of the Guild :lol: :lol: :lol:

And don't tar all "Handymen" with the same brush..... :angryfire:

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:48 pm 
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Scruff and Gadget started it lol.

I can only tar handymen with the brush they have given me to do the judging with after tending to work done by them.

Don't get me wrong, I have had to correct pi55 poor work carried out by 'trades' as you call them. Never seen poor work done by a craftsmen though. This is the point a lot of you guys miss, tradesmen are not qualified, craftsmen are. Tradesmen should be on a lot less money per day and handymen about half a craftsmens pay. So IMO handymen are a rip off due to the amount they want to be charging and this includes all the ones who jump from shop work because they decorated their lounge etc etc. Done a bit of DIY and are now the 'dogs nats' and worth top dollar and extra money of they work more than 5 miles from home.

Good job I am not a London Taxi driver.....................I would hate minicab drivers with a vengance.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:58 pm 
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Lets not open this can of worms again!.....there are *hite trades/craftsmen around and there are *hite handymen around, just like there are *hite human beings in all walks of life. But there are more good trades/craftsmen, handymen, and humans!!!

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:16 pm 
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craftsmen are beyond human...........Jesus was a carpenter/joiner pmsl.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:23 pm 
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Be nice RO rehanging a rad is well within a handymans capabilities :boxing:

Most of them will even make sure it rises towards the end with the airbleed :thumbright:





By about an inch :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:27 pm 
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royaloakcarpentry wrote:
craftsmen are beyond human...........Jesus was a carpenter/joiner pmsl.



Blimey, I didn't figure you being a god botherer?.. :shock:

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