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 Post subject: Gas hob connection
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:03 pm 
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I'm replacing an old gas hob with a new one. The new hob has a 1/2 inch screw-threaded (male) connector on it. I'm not quite sure what the old hob has (haven't yet removed it) but the gas supply comes in behind a cupboard and goes to the hob via an isolation valve, using soldered copper tubing. Can you recommend a flexible connector I can use to get from the 1/2 inch connector to the 15mm copper supply pipe, ideally connecting by compression to this. The only flexible tubing I could see in Screwfix (below) is a male connector (I'll need female) and it goes into a bayonet fitting. The instructions with the hob say to make the connections with rigid pipe but is this really necessary ?

http://www.screwfix.com/search.do;jsess ... x=14&y=16#


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:26 pm 
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If the hob is above an oven then a flexible hose is not allowed to be used as the temperatures may get above the safe working temperature of the hose. Also if the manafacturers instructions state it should be hard piped up to the hob then if you do not do this then it invalidates any warranty you may have on the hob.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:42 pm 
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My undesrtanding of the Corgi regs are that it must be a rigid fix going to a gas cock. Flexible fittings are not permitted.

Like all things the problems start if something goes wrong and if there were a fire or an explosion that lead to the loss of life you would be held responsible. For the sake of a few quid do it properly chum, get a Corgi to do it.

DWD


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:04 pm 
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it is absolutely necessary to use rigid pipework as it is determined by both the fitting instructions and corgi regs

perhaps you should get a corgi fitter out to fit this hob for you, probably will be the best £70 you will ever spend

I like being able to sleep easy at night


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:17 pm 
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I will confirm that the hob must be fitted on a rigid connection. As stated by you, as stated in the manufactures instructions!

You have proven incompetence by the questions you have asked, and can only advise that you get the gas connection by a CORGI registered person/company. Especially, as you are questioning the manufactures instructions!

The law states that DIY gas is ok, if your competent, which in my humble opinion I don't believe you are.

Also you need to be aware that EVERY new gas appliance needs to be notified to the building inspector, and if its a DIY job, you'll need to pay for them to inspect your work.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:09 pm 
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Hinton Heating wrote:
Also you need to be aware that EVERY new gas appliance needs to be notified to the building inspector, and if its a DIY job, you'll need to pay for them to inspect your work.


Which they'll look at and think about it then knowing absolutely nothing about gas will say "Yeah looks good to me!"

What they are all trying to say is.....

Hobs are and should be hard piped in the flexible pipes are for stand alone cookers not hobs.

Follow the manufacturers instructions. Take a trip to the local merchants with the fittings you have or a description and they'll keep you right.

Buy some GAS (in the Yellow container) PTFE.

Get what you need and come back if you need more help.

If you feel the job is just a little out of your league and I mean just a little. Get a Corgi man to do it for you!

Water will wet you gas WILL KILL you and yours. :cb

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darrenc wrote:
I dont think its a stupid question but does show a lack of understanding of how paint works and reasons for certain applications, now dont jump down my throat Jaegar i'm not being funny its just a classic case in point of a well educated professionally trained painter against a general tradesman.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:16 pm 
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and your neighbours too


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:27 pm 
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Jaeger_S2k wrote:
Hinton Heating wrote:
Also you need to be aware that EVERY new gas appliance needs to be notified to the building inspector, and if its a DIY job, you'll need to pay for them to inspect your work.


Which they'll look at and think about it then knowing absolutely nothing about gas will say "Yeah looks good to me!"



Actually, they'll probally ask the DIY installer to employ a Corgi, to issue a safety certificate, which the building inspector will want to see.

BTW, My advice may appear blunt, but as a CORGI, I need to provide the safest advice I can, based upon the first post.


Last edited by Hinton Heating on Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:28 pm 
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:thumbright:

None of us want to put you off but none of us want to encourage you and for you and others to get hurt.

Gas with Electricity are the 2 most deadly subjects on the forum for DIY.

Please be careful and if in doubt DON'T TOUCH IT!

Get a Corgi man and watch and learn for the next time.

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darrenc wrote:
I dont think its a stupid question but does show a lack of understanding of how paint works and reasons for certain applications, now dont jump down my throat Jaegar i'm not being funny its just a classic case in point of a well educated professionally trained painter against a general tradesman.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:59 pm 
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Hinton Heating wrote:
Jaeger_S2k wrote:
Hinton Heating wrote:
Also you need to be aware that EVERY new gas appliance needs to be notified to the building inspector, and if its a DIY job, you'll need to pay for them to inspect your work.


Which they'll look at and think about it then knowing absolutely nothing about gas will say "Yeah looks good to me!"



Actually, they'll probally ask the DIY installer to employ a Corgi, to issue a safety certificate, which the building inspector will want to see.

BTW, My advice may appear blunt, but as a CORGI, I need to provide the safest advice I can, based upon the first post.


You were 'Blunt' but you were right. Gas and incompetence are indeed a dangerous mix.

I'm just thinking he may have worded his enquiry better and may be more competent than his first post indicated. But as I've said a few times if he's not sure leave it alone.

I know the BC will ask for Corgi, better if you don't involve them, just call a Corgi out to certify and they send copy to you and inform and copy BC in on the certificate. Well mine does on my gas work.

(Have I got enough posts in on time for the competition yet? :roll: )

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darrenc wrote:
I dont think its a stupid question but does show a lack of understanding of how paint works and reasons for certain applications, now dont jump down my throat Jaegar i'm not being funny its just a classic case in point of a well educated professionally trained painter against a general tradesman.

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 6:45 am 
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Right - many thanks to all - I get the message loud and clear, Corgi time it is then. Cheers for all your help.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 6:56 am 
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:thumbright:

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darrenc wrote:
I dont think its a stupid question but does show a lack of understanding of how paint works and reasons for certain applications, now dont jump down my throat Jaegar i'm not being funny its just a classic case in point of a well educated professionally trained painter against a general tradesman.

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:03 am 
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well done john :thumbright:


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