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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 10:59 am 
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We have a 6x4 apex shed that the previous owners built. I'm guessing it's from tigersheds as there's a bottle of tigershed wood preservative that they had left behind.

For a while I've noticed the front of the shed feels lower than the back when I walk inside. I can't see any obvious rotting or warping.

I've measured using a spirit level and calculated that it's leaning forwards by 9 degrees. I suspect it's down to an uneven base.

How can I correct this?


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 12:22 pm 
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Something like a scaffold plank and some blocks to use as lever and fulcrum put under the shed will allow you to lift it while a mate pushes bricks or blocks underneath the bearers . Put some dpc in at the time and use treated timber , slate or plastic packers where necessary to level the whole thing.


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 2:12 pm 
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Thanks. I can't edit the original post but the angle is 2.7 degrees. Whilst I'm happy to lift yo the front and shove in some extra slabs for support, how do i make sure the whole shed base is adequately supported and not just the front?


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 3:20 pm 
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Stealthwolf wrote:
Thanks. I can't edit the original post but the angle is 2.7 degrees. Whilst I'm happy to lift yo the front and shove in some extra slabs for support, how do i make sure the whole shed base is adequately supported and not just the front?


You can't without difficulty, 6 x 4 is not that big so I would get some mates and move it off the base and then add a screed to level it or dig the base up and relay it.


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 5:36 pm 
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Tilt it upwards as described above and pour some concrete. You will need to make a frame to keep it in until it dries. The floor is usually supported by 1.5 by 1.5s and won't be able to keep it's shape across the span.


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 5:54 pm 
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Stealthwolf wrote:
Thanks. I can't edit the original post but the angle is 2.7 degrees. Whilst I'm happy to lift yo the front and shove in some extra slabs for support, how do i make sure the whole shed base is adequately supported and not just the front?


Put blocks under all of the floor joists. They're easy enough to push into place with a piece of timber so you or your mate won't have to crawl under a shed lifted on a lever.
Incidentally a 2.7 degree slope doesn't really mean a fat lot in building , we more often use a 1 in something term such as 1in60 for instance. Easy enough to measure , a one inch block under the lower end of the spirit level and move it to or from the higher end until it reads level , then just measure the distance between the block and the high end.


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 11:03 pm 
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Grendel wrote:
Incidentally a 2.7 degree slope doesn't really mean a fat lot in building , we more often use a 1 in something term such as 1in60 for instance. Easy enough to measure , a one inch block under the lower end of the spirit level and move it to or from the higher end until it reads level , then just measure the distance between the block and the high end.

Using that terminology, then it's 1 in 27.

The problem is that I don't know if it's always been like that (and stable) or a new problem. In the three years ai've lived here, the front has felt a bit low.


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