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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 8:57 pm 
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They condemned two pairs of forklift truck forks a few weeks back when I was on site, they were destined for the scrap skip after a firm came in and NDT tested them and found cracks. I asked for two of the forks and decided to make some fox wedges from them.
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I cut a couple of them at home using the Rage 2 with a stainless steel blade. Bear in mind that the maximum cutting capacity of the Rage 2 is 6mm and that the forks are about three inches by 1.5 inches of high carbon steel :lol:

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Eventually I took one of the forks back to work and cut it into fox wedges using the metal cutting bandsaw. I started off making 6 wedges, two for myself and two for two other fitters on the day team, then I made 4 more for two of the shift fitters. I have also just cut another 10 and will eventually give two to every fitter on site.

After cutting the fox wedges I use an angle grinder and flap disc to remove the saw marks, then use a Dronco polishing kit in the grinder to polish the steel until I get a decent finish.

It probably takes 20-30 minutes to cut and polish each wedge but it’s well worth it as these are a very useful tool if you are a fitter as you can knock them into the tiniest of gaps in pipework in order to fit gaskets etc.


In this picture you can see the different levels of polishing, on the right is a wedge that has been cut on the bandsaw, then a wedge that has been cleaned up using a flap disc in the grinder, then each wedge has been polished with a finer grade of polishing disc (the last two on the left have also been polished using polishing compound).
Attachment:
polish-metal (Medium).JPG
polish-metal (Medium).JPG [ 63.37 KiB | Viewed 1737 times ]


You can buy fox wedges but they are not common and don't normally come polished like this.

I'm now thinking of other things to make from the other fork :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 9:33 pm 
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excellent job chez :huray:
suspect the cutting depth is to stop the motor being overloaded by people "forcing " it to cut
as you know most tools will go far bigger and far deeper iff you feed in gently rather than all guns blazing
but nice touch looking after your workmates :huray: :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 10:14 pm 
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Newbie question - what's a fox wedge?

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 10:37 pm 
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The Engineer wrote:
Newbie question - what's a fox wedge?

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http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Fox+wedge

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 1:15 am 
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MANY thanks all round - so much to learn -
and so many willing co-operators :thumbleft: ...... :thumbright:



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:27 am 
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Didn't know they were used in a metal working scenario chez! Tidy job!
Last time I used fox wedges was when I was serving my time!!



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:35 am 
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They look great. I also find steel wedges very useful for working on machines, I don't anything that size though! lol.



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:55 am 
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The Engineer wrote:
Newbie question - what's a fox wedge?

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We use them on site for a few jobs. On the glass washing machines there are some rollers that have wheels which are held in place with split collars, which are made from 316 stainless. If you need to position or move the wheels on the shaft you loosen the screw in the split collar but then you need to create a gap in the split collar before you can move the wheel (there is a split collar at each side of the wheel with a stainless pin going right through the wheel). If you try knocking the wheel with a hammer without knocking a fox wedge in each of the collars the collars bind on the stainless shaft and make a right mess of it (if you can get the wheel to move at all). You can see one briefly in this video-
https://youtu.be/UQ2gbO2Wynk?t=179

We also use them for lifting machines or creating gaps, you would be surprised on just what you can lift by knocking a steel wedge underneath a machine weighing a couple of tonnes.

They are also handy if you need to split flanged pipework as you can remove the bolts and knock a wedge in right on the edge of the flange that will give you a gap large enough to get a new gasket in etc.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 12:11 pm 
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Nice job Chez!
I was going to ask what the forklift driver is going to say on Monday morning, but then I saw they were scrap! :lol:
Must be a decent bit of steel that.
As you say wedges are useful for all sorts if you're working on heavy machinery.



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:52 pm 
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Hi,

Excellent job Chez and many thanks for sharing. :salute: Fork truck forks sure are finger trappers and very heavy; good job you didn't have to go at it with an hacksaw or you would still be sawing. When such wedges are needed they are needed badly; proper wedges like yours are the way to go but these days I try to get by using my selection of cold chisels; we used to make our wedges at the blacksmiths forge in the pit.

It's nice to see the old skills haven't entirely died out; keep up the good work. :thumbleft:

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:45 pm 
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Polished as well, thats keen Chez! Very handy thing to have in the toolbox.

Nice shallow wedges are very powerful.
Use them quite a bit on fabrication jobs, if a wedge cant make it fit, its not going to. :lol:
Used with a dog welded on, and a wedge knocked underneath more often or not, great for getting plates level with each other.
Another common use for steel wedges is to raise and position steel columns, a wedge will lift it as required and also hold it in position whilst fixing down and packing.
We regularly supply wedges by the hundred, plasma cut from 30mm thick plate, so always a few knocking around the workshop.

Dog and wedge explanation here...https://app.aws.org/forum/topic_show.pl?tid=34367

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:35 pm 
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I'd never heard of Fox wedges... Nice to see that the evolution saw is more than capable though...

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:57 pm 
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This is why I wondered about it being used in situations other than joinery. In joinery a fox wedge and a normal wedge are used in different situations like in the photo below.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:06 am 
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Handy, no doubt! I've always had an axe in the tool bag for 'splitting mating surfaces', mainly joinery though.

I wouldn't want to leave my axe wedged under a steel stanchion!

Why is it a fox-wedge though? Is it not just a wedge unless used in a specific way, i.e. fox-wedging a tenon?

Imagine the size of the tenon if the fox-wedges were this size!

Great use of the scrap forks.

I just came here from the Slogging spanners made from old fork lift forks post.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:53 am 
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marcusjkw wrote:

Why is it a fox-wedge though? Is it not just a wedge unless used in a specific way, i.e. fox-wedging a tenon?



I only know of the carpentry uses, but I've always thought they were called Fox Wedges to echo the Foxes cunning, as in my preferred use of them in a closed mortice; this makes it a stub tenon, but wedged - cunning, you see. :-)

Not my drawing, nicked from the web.
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