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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 1:55 pm 
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Hi,
I'm new to the forum and need some assistance. I am considering fitting a downstairs toilet in our utility room. The issue I am having is whether or not to fit a macerator or to fit a new soil stack and connect to the sewer drain in my back garden which is adjacent to the utility room.

I should perhaps give some background. The utility room is, I suspect, what used to be an outbuilding but it is connected to the house. The previous occupants turned it into a utility room and it currently houses our washing machine, tumble drier and other things, so there is plumbing already into it. The house was built in the 1930's and is an ex council house. There is a drain cover approximately one metre away from the outside wall of the utility room in our back garden. I have lifted this and it is obviously shared with neighbouring houses as there are pipes running through it from next door and they then head across the back garden towards the neighbours on the other side.

The main soil stack from our bathroom in the house is on the opposite side of the house, so tapping into that is not an option.

Having done some research I am now more confused than when I started as there is conflicting advice regarding macerator's and little advice regarding connecting to the sewer.

My questions are:-

Is fitting a macerator the best option and if so, how do I deal with the waste? Will it need to be connected directly into the sewer drain?

If fitting a soil stack to the single storey outbuilding, can I then connect this directly to the sewer drain (only about a metre away), if so, do I need permission?

Any advice gratefully received.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:14 pm 
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My thoughts are generally as follows, firstly in answer to your questions:-
I do not see a macerator as being necessary.
    No need for a soil stack as the drainage system as installed is served by the other stack.
    You would pipe your new toilet direct to the nearby inspection chamber.
    Your new toilet/drain would be vented by fitting a local air admittance valve.

The work would involve excavating a trench between the existing Inspection chamber and the external wall of the Utility Room.
I would anticipate the new drain entering the Chamber so the invert of the new pipe is level with the top of the channel splits.
You would also need to excavate the floor of the Utility to a depth same as the external excavation.
Break a hole through the brick wall to accept the new drain.
Pipe up usinf 110mm Underground plastic pipework laid to falls. Ideally you should have a short length of pipe (rocker) passing through the wall of the inspection chamber.
Inside the utility, you need to position an equal 110mm Tee with the top socket level with the floor (position suitable to accept new WC Pan)
Fit a short length of pipe to the branch of the Tee followed by a 90deg short 110mm bend + a further short pipe to accept the air admittance valve. NB: These short lengths of pipe would be decided by the type and size of the WC you have bought and the location of the AAValve

davyp1



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:23 pm 
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Most plumbers (except those selling maceraters full time :roll: ) will tell you to avoid them at all costs, too much trouble and terrible to work on if they get blocked. There are exceptions in some medical institutions where they might be needed but in your own home I would avoid them.



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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 6:12 pm 
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Yes - as the others have said, don't fit a maceratoring toilet. When it goes wrong (which it will at some point) you'll probably struggle to find anyone willing to come out to it. I've done one once and I still feel traumatised by it -- never, ever, again. They're an absolute last resort when there's no feasible option for running 110mm.

You need to look at Building Regs Approved Document H. You may be able to connect the toilet straight to the sewer without a stub stack if the drain is ventilated by other means. Otherwise an AAAV for ventilation as per davyp1's post. Any doubts, give the Building Control Officer a call/e-mail at your local council. They're usually pretty helpful in my experience. No reason at all why you can't DIY-it as long as you conform to the regs.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:32 pm 
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davyp1, please excuse my crude drawing but is this the kind of thing you're meaning?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:04 pm 
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sparty69 wrote:
davyp1, please excuse my crude drawing but is this the kind of thing you're meaning?


Hi sparty69,
Yes your sketch does outline the basic idea.
But I would suggest a toilet pan with an S trap _ https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&s ... =wc+s+trap
Using a WC with an S trap outlet would mean your Tee would be totally in the internal excavation, spigot pointing down and top collar level with the concrete floor (or just above it to suit the WC you buy. The branch of the Tee would be below the floor level and pointing either left or right. You would fit a short pipe and a bend + another short pipe and the AAAValve.
I omitted to mention before that the Tee would also require a 90deg bend at the bottom to pick up the pipe to the Inspection chamber.

The location of the Tee in the concrete floor to pick up the WC outlet pipe would also have to be in a suitable position to enable the Cistern to be fitted to the wall.

davyp1


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:39 pm 
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Thanks davyp1, a very good and detailed description which I understand completely. I will be fitting a basin as well, which I assume I can just connect into the 110mm outlet pipe?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:01 pm 
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Yes you can.
Make the vertical pipe that takes the AAAvalve a little longer which will allow you to fit one of these above floor level:-
http://www.plumbcenter.co.uk/product/ma ... 0deg-grey/

davyp1


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:22 am 
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Sparty69 just an afterthought. It is good practice before back-filling your trench between the inspection chamber and the wall to surround the pipe with a couple of inches of pipe bedding (10mm gravel or chippings)

davyp1


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 10:26 am 
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Thanks for all your advice davyp1, all very helpful. If you don't mind, just one more thing, the photo attached shows the inspection chamber which I am wanting to tap into. As you can see, there is an additional pipe entering this already that someone has previously installed. This carries the waste water from the washing machine. Rather than go to the trouble of breaking a new hole in the inspection chamber wall, would it be feasible to put a T piece on this existing pipe to attach the new one to?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 6:03 pm 
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I am assuming that the Washing machine Waste enters the Chamber in the same direction
as the proposed new WC drain!
That being the case, you would branch in using a 45deg Y-junction:-
http://www.plasticdrainage.co.uk/equal- ... o_s=gplauk

To make this work, you may have to cut the existing drain (Washer) for the Y-junc and remove the remaining pipe from the Chamber.
This will allow you to re-pipe it. Be prepared that you may have to introduce a couple of bends to make it work.
At the start, I suggest you check levels between the Utility room floor & the Chamber top (Bang a peg in the ground next to the chamber & mark the floor level on it. (Use a timber straight edge & level. You may have to use the nerest doorway to transfer the level. Be prepared to bang a peg in at the end of the straight edge untill the S.edge is leel when sat on top of peg. Keep going untill you reach the chamber peg and mark it. If concrete hardstand & not soil, use a brick & various packers to trasfer the level)
On paper, work out what depth the interior pipes take up (Tee +con pipe +90bend) Add to this a nominal amount of fall (say 40mm) and check that you have the same distance or more to the invert of the washer pipe!
If you have the calculated amount then fine. If not you may have to take a brick out to get the chamber end of the pipe so its invert is the same level as the chanel split!

Cheers,
davyp1


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:13 pm 
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Yes the drain is coming from the same direction. I think I may need to re-read your description of getting the level and fall right a few times to understand it :-) :thumbleft: Thanks again for all your help davyp1


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