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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:09 pm 
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from screwfix http://www.screwfix.com/p/evolution-rag ... 230v/20332

Saw this saw on offer when I popped into Sfix to buy decking end grain preservative..

As I'm currently suffering with my elbow (Tennis elbow? or maybe a torn something or other) I figured that for just £49.99 it would be stupid not to buy. (I normally cut my decking by hand...I know..call me a Luddite)

Anyway, despite mixed reviews on Sfix, I found it perfectly set up straight outta the box, all square and true, mitres spot on, bevels spot on.

Now it does have its limitations in terms of cutting abilities but for decking/skirting/mouldings it's fine.

Cuts deck board up to 120mm with ease.

After the first dozen or so straight and true cuts however, I cut one board that was out of square... :?

It seems that the "Mitre lock" can loosen due to vibration, which was what had happened in my case.

The destruction manual tells you tighten the lock with a screwdriver.. :sad: doesn't work..

However if you lift the plastic arm, turn it as far as it will go anti-clockwise, then drop the arm and turn it fully clockwise once or thrice then the mitre lock works again.

Overall a useful bit of kit for the avid DIYer or a Handyman.

A pro Carpenter would want something with more capability/robustness though.

On the downside replacement blades are almost as expensive as the machine itself.. :scratch:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:02 pm 
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You don't have to buy evolution blades wine-o,for a couple of quid you can but a bore convertor(25.4mm I think) that enables you to purchase any make of blade.
I think you've got the review correct in terms of who would buy this,diy or handyman. I've had one and even for rough work and cutting up nail embedded timber for burning it didn't last long at all.
The cut achieved with the blade provided is poor and the accuracy of the saw is not great either.
There is a reason they are 50 quid in my opinion!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:27 pm 
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steviejoiner74 wrote:
You don't have to buy evolution blades wine-o,for a couple of quid you can but a bore convertor(25.4mm I think) that enables you to purchase any make of blade.

The cut achieved with the blade provided is poor and the accuracy of the saw is not great either.


Have to say the cut quality was fine, accuracy was spot on....

Thanks for the tip regarding alternative blades though..appreciated. :thumbleft:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:29 pm 
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Hi,

For general DIY Evolution saws are OK and I don't think you've been robbed wine~o; if you let the saw do its work without stressing it the saw should give you decent service. As sj74 says you can install other cheaper blades and these can be the common carbide tipped blades but these won't cut through metal; if you try you could lose fingers so please be warned.

I bought a big Evolution saw a few years ago this one with a 3" x 12" capacity but sold it a while ago because I no longer needed it already having a much more expensive and accurate Dewalt. However wine~o just for interest here's what I get up to when I'm desperate although I certainly do not recommend copying my working practices which would give the H&S lot nightmares for years. I sent the following pictures to the MD at Evolution and he was amazed. I needed to cut through a large diameter cast iron blank whilst I was making a replacement back gear for one of my lathes and thought I'd put the Evolution through its paces; it dropped through the cast iron surprisingly easy although I needed to wear ear defenders; safety goggles and gloves; it cut through more than half way then I turned the blank around and completed the cut. It sure made a racket and threw cast iron chips all over the garage but I was pleased with the result; the third picture shows the blank gear roughed out. The cast iron blank was securely clamped in place during cutting and I ensured I was out of line of fire if something untoward happened.

Keep your fingers out of the danger area wine~o and please keep safe.

Kind regards, Col.

Attachment:
Evolution saw 6.JPG
Evolution saw 6.JPG [ 158.46 KiB | Viewed 3549 times ]
Attachment:
Evolution saw 5.JPG
Evolution saw 5.JPG [ 183.29 KiB | Viewed 3549 times ]
Attachment:
Evolution saw 3.JPG
Evolution saw 3.JPG [ 137.13 KiB | Viewed 3549 times ]

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:35 pm 
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Col, I'm very safety conscious after all I'm only cutting Deckboards so far, not cast iron... :shock: :shock:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:40 pm 
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Here's the thing if you want to put different blades in wine-o,you get them much cheaper on fleabay as well.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/blade-reducing- ... B00GLONES4



For this message the author steviejoiner74 has received gratitude : wine~o
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 6:09 pm 
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Retired wrote:
Hi,

For general DIY Evolution saws are OK and I don't think you've been robbed wine~o; if you let the saw do its work without stressing it the saw should give you decent service. As sj74 says you can install other cheaper blades and these can be the common carbide tipped blades but these won't cut through metal; if you try you could lose fingers so please be warned.

I bought a big Evolution saw a few years ago this one with a 3" x 12" capacity but sold it a while ago because I no longer needed it already having a much more expensive and accurate Dewalt. However wine~o just for interest here's what I get up to when I'm desperate although I certainly do not recommend copying my working practices which would give the H&S lot nightmares for years. I sent the following pictures to the MD at Evolution and he was amazed. I needed to cut through a large diameter cast iron blank whilst I was making a replacement back gear for one of my lathes and thought I'd put the Evolution through its paces; it dropped through the cast iron surprisingly easy although I needed to wear ear defenders; safety goggles and gloves; it cut through more than half way then I turned the blank around and completed the cut. It sure made a racket and threw cast iron chips all over the garage but I was pleased with the result; the third picture shows the blank gear roughed out. The cast iron blank was securely clamped in place during cutting and I ensured I was out of line of fire if something untoward happened.

Keep your fingers out of the danger area wine~o and please keep safe.

Kind regards, Col.

Attachment:
Evolution saw 6.JPG
Attachment:
Evolution saw 5.JPG
Attachment:
Evolution saw 3.JPG


Blimey Col, that is a fair old piece of metal :shock:

The Rage saws often say that they can cut 6mm think steel but they can easily cut much thicker than that with ease!

It takes a bit of getting used to the hot chips when cutting steel but the saws do a brilliant job of it, much better than an abrasive disc!

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 7:24 pm 
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as an aside

when cutting loads off boards and you dont quite have enough width off cut
say your boards are 143 and you can only cut 120mm
take a bit off 12mm ply/mdf/wood the width off the table and depth off the wood your cutting and double sided tape to the table
the exact thickness depends on blade size and how much off the blade is below the table top but in general its 50% the extra width required
and off course restricted by the maximum cutting depth off the saw [motor or gaurd grounding on top off the timber]

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 7:49 pm 
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big-all wrote:
as an aside

when cutting loads off boards and you dont quite have enough width off cut
say your boards are 143 and you can only cut 120mm
take a bit off 12mm ply/mdf/wood the width off the table and depth off the wood your cutting and double sided tape to the table
the exact thickness depends on blade size and how much off the blade is below the table top but in general its 50% the extra width required
and off course restricted by the maximum cutting depth off the saw [motor or gaurd grounding on top off the timber]


Didn't understand a word of that B-A......

Buuuuuut I needed to do a couple of mite cuts on the 120mm boards. as a mitre the saw will only do 80mm...flip the wood 180 degrees and you can do a 160mm mitre...

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:16 pm 
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I think what Al means is if you want to cut a bit 145 skirting on the saw which could only cut say 120mm,pack the 145 skirting up with a bit scrap 25mm thick material and it'll enable you to cut a wider board. Or buy a bigger mitre saw.....



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:26 pm 
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it only has to be around half the thickness as the blade at the bottom off arc is going forward by around 3 to 0ne up
of couse you go a bit futher up the blade its forward one and up one
then it reduces as you near the front off the blade

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:32 pm 
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ahh...got you now...

Pack it up and then you get the maximum diameter of the blade... :thumbleft:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:41 pm 
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Hi,

I was just looking out for you wine~o and others who use this kind of saw especially for the first time as novices without any previous knowledge or training regarding just how dangerous these saws can be. I've seen first hand what a small £30 Aldi mitre saw can do regarding inflicting serious injury. Our friend and neighbour Eddie bought the Aldi saw and Eddie is similar age to me and used to handling power tools; Eddie called me over to see his new toy having bought it because he was installing a new wooden staircase; whilst there Eddie asked if I could trim the newel posts to length on one of my big saws and of course I was glad to help out; at the time I had a big Wadkin industrial chop saw and said to Eddie that if he wanted his spindles trimming to length just bring them all over because it will only take a few minutes; Eddie replied he wanted to try his new saw out so I returned home.This was a beautiful Saturday afternoon.

The following Tuesday Gwyneth who is Eddie's wife popped over to see us asking if we had heard about Eddie? Eddie had been successfully cutting the stair spindles using an angled cut to the right without the slightest problem then he swung the saw to the left and promptly just about severed his left thumb from his hand in a very long cut which later he said he never felt at the time; as many novices do he had been holding the spindle against the fence but forgot that the saw would run towards his hand. It took two years of plastic surgery at Bradford hospital to get his hand looking reasonable again; the surgeons worked a miracle because Eddie has full use of his thumb again but what a terrible way to learn such a lesson; he showed me the effects of plastic surgery shortly after being discharged from hospital and I was very sorry to see the huge fresh bump over the wound where skin had been transplanted from another part of his body. These saws are readily available to raw novices and fortunately most survive without a scratch but my friend Eddie got so easily caught out.

You are so right Chez about the very hot chips these saws spit out in large quantities whilst cutting metal; the chips are indeed very hot hence personal protective gear is needed but strangely the metal being cut remains quite cool?

Good point b_a; yes raising thinner timber that is just too wide for the saw to cut normally brings a larger diameter of the blade into contact and as you say this is limited by the saw arbor. For multiple cuts its worth rigging up a "stop" then only the first piece needs marking for length and after checking and double checking the length once the stop is set all the other pieces are cut exactly to the same length. We had a big Bursgreen radial arm saw at work in the timber department and when set up for pallet making we cut four boards at once which saved lots of time.

Enjoy your new toy wine~o it will save you lots of time and effort.

Kind regards, Col.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 9:10 pm 
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Retired wrote:
Hi,

I was just looking out for you wine~o and others who use this kind of saw especially for the first time as novices without any previous knowledge or training regarding just how dangerous these saws can be. I've seen first hand what a small £30 Aldi mitre saw can do regarding inflicting serious injury. Our friend and neighbour Eddie bought the Aldi saw and Eddie is similar age to me and used to handling power tools; Eddie called me over to see his new toy having bought it because he was installing a new wooden staircase; whilst there Eddie asked if I could trim the newel posts to length on one of my big saws and of course I was glad to help out; at the time I had a big Wadkin industrial chop saw and said to Eddie that if he wanted his spindles trimming to length just bring them all over because it will only take a few minutes; Eddie replied he wanted to try his new saw out so I returned home.This was a beautiful Saturday afternoon.

The following Tuesday Gwyneth who is Eddie's wife popped over to see us asking if we had heard about Eddie? Eddie had been successfully cutting the stair spindles using an angled cut to the right without the slightest problem then he swung the saw to the left and promptly just about severed his left thumb from his hand in a very long cut which later he said he never felt at the time; as many novices do he had been holding the spindle against the fence but forgot that the saw would run towards his hand. It took two years of plastic surgery at Bradford hospital to get his hand looking reasonable again; the surgeons worked a miracle because Eddie has full use of his thumb again but what a terrible way to learn such a lesson; he showed me the effects of plastic surgery shortly after being discharged from hospital and I was very sorry to see the huge fresh bump over the wound where skin had been transplanted from another part of his body. These saws are readily available to raw novices and fortunately most survive without a scratch but my friend Eddie got so easily caught out.

You are so right Chez about the very hot chips these saws spit out in large quantities whilst cutting metal; the chips are indeed very hot hence personal protective gear is needed but strangely the metal being cut remains quite cool?

Good point b_a; yes raising thinner timber that is just too wide for the saw to cut normally brings a larger diameter of the blade into contact and as you say this is limited by the saw arbor. For multiple cuts its worth rigging up a "stop" then only the first piece needs marking for length and after checking and double checking the length once the stop is set all the other pieces are cut exactly to the same length. We had a big Bursgreen radial arm saw at work in the timber department and when set up for pallet making we cut four boards at once which saved lots of time.

Enjoy your new toy wine~o it will save you lots of time and effort.

Kind regards, Col.


They are very dangerous in the wrong hands. There was one guy who put the circular saw down on the floor whilst the machine was still turning, it travelled up his leg and severed his artery. I can't be 100% certain but I think he died!

I made a video a few years back on circular saw safety, I was contacted by a large university who asked my permission to download it from YouTube and use it on the university computers. Of course I gave them permission :wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:58 pm 
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wine~o wrote:
from screwfix http://www.screwfix.com/p/evolution-rage3b2102-210mm-compound-mitre-saw-230v/20332

Saw this saw on offer when I popped into Sfix to buy decking end grain preservative..

As I'm currently suffering with my elbow (Tennis elbow? or maybe a torn something or other) I figured that for just £49.99 it would be stupid not to buy. (I normally cut my decking by hand...I know..call me a Luddite)

Anyway, despite mixed reviews on Sfix, I found it perfectly set up straight outta the box, all square and true, mitres spot on, bevels spot on.

Now it does have its limitations in terms of cutting abilities but for decking/skirting/mouldings it's fine.

Cuts deck board up to 120mm with ease.

After the first dozen or so straight and true cuts however, I cut one board that was out of square... :?

It seems that the "Mitre lock" can loosen due to vibration, which was what had happened in my case.

The destruction manual tells you tighten the lock with a screwdriver.. :sad: doesn't work..

However if you lift the plastic arm, turn it as far as it will go anti-clockwise, then drop the arm and turn it fully clockwise once or thrice then the mitre lock works again.

Overall a useful bit of kit for the avid DIYer or a Handyman.

A pro Carpenter would want something with more capability/robustness though.

On the downside replacement blades are almost as expensive as the machine itself.. :scratch:
I was thinking of buying one of these but it's now £79.99 :cb


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