DIY Forum

 

Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:50 am
Visit Thermo worx


Time zone: Europe/London




 

 


Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:59 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:44 pm
Posts: 8
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
When I use the setting 750 Kw of my electric heater is okay but when I use the setting 1250 kw the plug of my electric heater because a little bit hot and when I use the two settings i.e. in total 2000 Kw the plug of my electric heater become very hot. One pin of the plug of my heater is hotter than the other.

Last year this defect damaged the holes of the socket in my extension cable by burning them

It does also this with a new heater and a new extension cable so the heater and the extension cable does not seem to be responsible for this. Moreover the socket in the wall seems also not be responsible because it does this even when I use another socket in the wall

During the day I can move from time to time the plug of my heater to another socket of my extension cable to prevent that the hole of the socket become too hot but I am worried because during the night because I will be asleep for many hours I would not be able to do this

Currently I use only the 750 Kw setting and the 1250 Kw setting but not both but when it will become colder I will need to use both and I do not want to damage the socket in my new extension cable so I would like to know what to do?

I would like to know if I can do the following:

a) Repair the defect because this could be complicated because I live in a room which is separate from the main house

b) or simply to buy a device that I can plug in the socket of my extension cable so that it absorbs the surplus of energy produced by the plug of my electric heater and prevent the socket of my new extension cable from being damaged by being burnt i.e. a kind of buffer

c) or maybe it will be better that I buy a second electric heater that I use only with 750 Kw setting or the 1250 Kw setting so that using both electric heater with these low setting it will be equivalent to use 2000 Kw which could be enough to heat my room when the weather will become colder


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on DeliciousShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 3:08 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:20 pm
Posts: 2975
Has thanked: 897 times
Been thanked: 885 times
It's a bad idea to have a heater plugged into an extension cable.
Most heaters say not to run them on an extension cable in the instructions.
So the answer is to plug it directly into a wall socket.
If any socket (or plug) has signs of heat damage it is probably damaged inside, which may well cause more heating.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 3:15 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 3:49 pm
Posts: 22423
Location: hants/dorset border
Has thanked: 1338 times
Been thanked: 3403 times
What Dave said, more than likely a loose connection within either the plug or the socket. check the plug first (if a moulded plug you may want to cut it off and replace.)

If the socket then it will need any damaged wires cut back to sound and connection remade. lecky off before removing socket.

_________________
Verwood Handyman

Verwood Handyman


___________________________________________________________________

If you feel you have benefited from the Free advice given on the Forum, Please consider making a donation to UHM's Nominated charity, read all about it and donate here :

http://www.donnasdreamhouse.co.uk/



For this message the author wine~o has received gratitude : Dave54
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:35 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:44 pm
Posts: 8
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Dave54 says

“It's a bad idea to have a heater plugged into an extension cable.”

However I have no choice because the cable of my heater is too short and the socket in the wall is too far way and I like to have my heater near to me where I sit so that it keeps me warm because it is a big room. Even if I plug it to a socket in the wall and not into an extension cable when the plug overheats it will damage the socket in the wall instead of damaging the socket in my extension cable. My extension cable is of good quality because it is a blue one which cost more than the usual less good quality white one

wine~o says

“What Dave said, more than likely a loose connection within either the plug or the socket. check the plug first (if a moulded plug you may want to cut it off and replace.)”

However last year I had another electric heater which plug already overheated and also I use another extension cable which was damaged and I pluged the extension cable also in another socket in the wall so it could not be the plug of the heater or the socket of the extension cable or the socket in the wall.
I am wondering if it is not due to a defect in the electrical box in the room or in the main house which cause an unbalance in the network which explain that one of the two pins of the plug of my heater heats more than the other

Another issue is that last year my electric heater has its plug broken and I changed it with a cheap plug moreover I did the work myself and it is why maybe it overheated. However the fact that the plug of my new heater overheat also and has also one of his pins heating more than the other make me think that it was not due to my work or to the bad quality of the new plug

One solution could be that as I say in my initial post I buy a device which could be some kind of buffer but I do not know which device to buy


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:56 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:20 pm
Posts: 2975
Has thanked: 897 times
Been thanked: 885 times
You do have a choice. You have the choice of getting a proper socket permanently wired into the house wiring where you need it.
That is the correct thing to do.

One pin is heating more than the other because one connection has a higher resistance than the other. This can be due to the pins not making proper contact in the socket, possibly due to earlier heating damage, or as Wine~o says bad connection(s) inside the plug, including the connection between the fuse and the clips it generally sits in.
It's not due to an imbalance in the circuits.

Everything needs to be in good condition to run electric heating off a 13A socket, without an extension lead.
By putting an extension lead in circuit, you are adding more resistance to the circuit, with more chance of there being a bad connection, and hence problems, or even a fire.
That's why it says in most instructions not to do it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 5:25 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 3:49 pm
Posts: 22423
Location: hants/dorset border
Has thanked: 1338 times
Been thanked: 3403 times
Monday wrote:
I am wondering if it is not due to a defect in the electrical box in the room or in the main house which cause an unbalance in the network which explain that one of the two pins of the plug of my heater heats more than the other

Another issue is that last year my electric heater has its plug broken and I changed it with a cheap plug moreover I did the work myself and it is why maybe it overheated. However the fact that the plug of my new heater overheat also and has also one of his pins heating more than the other make me think that it was not due to my work or to the bad quality of the new plug


Given the above can I suggest that you get a local electrician or competent handyman in to check your wiring ?

There is no "Device" that will stop the plug/socket overheating if there is a fault at either the plug/socket.

As Dave says, if left as is there is a possibility that the overheating plug/socket could catch fire.

_________________
Verwood Handyman

Verwood Handyman


___________________________________________________________________

If you feel you have benefited from the Free advice given on the Forum, Please consider making a donation to UHM's Nominated charity, read all about it and donate here :

http://www.donnasdreamhouse.co.uk/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 7:17 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:44 pm
Posts: 8
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
My room has already four sets of two sockets one in each wall i.e. in total eights sockets in the walls but because my room is big the cable of my heater is too short if I want to directly plug it on one of these eight sockets without using an extension cable

All is new the extension cable and also the heater.

I do not think that the sockets in the extension cable have yet been damaged by overheated because I have not yet used my new heater at its maximal capacity

The extension cable has four sockets and this defect appears when I use any of these four sockets

The defect appears with any of the eight socket in the wall. I would like to know if it is possible that a defect in one of these eight sockets will cause this overheating even if another socket is used?

The question is to know if it is normal that one of the two pins of the plug of my heater heats more than the other?

There is a big box in my room which seems to be where all electric devices are but it seems to be sealed so difficult to open and maybe the defect come from this box?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 7:35 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:20 pm
Posts: 2975
Has thanked: 897 times
Been thanked: 885 times
Thinking something is OK electrically is never a replacement for actual tests, and inspection by someone who is electrically competent. The plug(s) OR socket(s) could be faulty.

If low quality sockets have been used, and /or low quality plugs this might be part of the problem.

I've already explained why one pin of the plug might be warmer than the other.

I'd suggest that you put the heater nearer to a socket, and sit there.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:56 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2010 5:51 pm
Posts: 7119
Has thanked: 345 times
Been thanked: 1256 times
Is the extension lead fully unrolled?

They lead itself can get very hot if it's coiled up and pulling a lot of current: hot enough to start a fire.

As already said though, a loose connection somewhere is the most likely reason for your problem.

_________________
One day it will all be firewood.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:41 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:44 pm
Posts: 8
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
I bought a very good quality blue extension cable but it is very long and because my room is not very big it is not very well unrolled. I am going to unroll it better to see if this defect still exists. Do you think that the defect can be due to the extension cable not being very well unrolled?

Yes the defect can come from a loose connection but the issue is to know where this loose connection is? This defect existed with my previous heater and my previous extension cable but I have now a new heater and a new extension cable and this defect still exists so the loose connection cannot be in the new extension cable or in the new heater. Moreover this defect exists even when I use a different socket in the wall so the defect cannot be in the socket in the wall


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:16 pm 
Online
Senior Member

Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 7:03 pm
Posts: 6560
Has thanked: 32 times
Been thanked: 1100 times
Since you have used a new extension lead, a new socket, and now a new heater, I would suggest the bad connection is the heater plug.
Cut it off and fit a decent MK plug.
The other thing to note is when something has become too warm it will not "get better" and so should be replaced (A bit like burning the toast, its horrible and best if you bin it). If you continue to use it, it exaggerates the problem.

_________________
Take it easy, a forum is only a collection of opinions. Above, are mine.

Which is correct? Metre or Meter? Click the link. to find out more.

No such thing as "Thou shalt put this wire here, Thou shalt put that wire there" .............Take a picture BEFORE you do the job.

If gloom had a voice, it would be me. :mrgreen:

:idea1: How to post a picture on this forum Click here



For this message the author someone-else has received gratitude : multiman
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:31 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:20 pm
Posts: 2975
Has thanked: 897 times
Been thanked: 885 times
You should unwind coiled up extensions, because the cable can't dissipate the heat produced by the current flowing in it if it is wound up, and so the cable itself may overheat.

I really would take wine~o's advice above and get the whole setup looked at by a professional, and act on their advice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:32 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2010 5:51 pm
Posts: 7119
Has thanked: 345 times
Been thanked: 1256 times
Monday wrote:
Do you think that the defect can be due to the extension cable not being very well unrolled?


No, probably not: but it's equally dangerous in it's own way.

_________________
One day it will all be firewood.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:47 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 1929
Location: Kent, Land of Apples and PYO
Has thanked: 38 times
Been thanked: 387 times
1.Here's an idea, get a electrician to fit a socket nearer where you need it
2. Get 2 smaller heaters
3.Buy a heater with a longer lead
4. If rented give your landlord a kick up the backside to get the heating fixed
5. dress in layers, it keeps in the heat any wear a hat
6. what are you going to do when it gets properly cold

What is happening is called physics, the plug is getting too hot as it cant get enough power, A high resistance at the plug and socket is the cause of the heat, this is why they tell you not to use extension leads with heaters or high loads

This video simulates what can happen



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:52 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:51 pm
Posts: 7305
Location: Essex
Has thanked: 431 times
Been thanked: 1468 times
This might be a solution https://www.screwfix.com/p/stanley-st-1 ... -2kw/7216p

DWD

_________________
Painting with BIN


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Hilti


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO