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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 7:05 am 
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Hi all,

We're currently in the process of ordering a kitchen with b&q, basically because I've always used them. However I've discovered diy kitchens who look good, but their "finish types" such as lacquered, painted, foil wrapped etc has me stumped. Are some bad news and to be avoided, why the different types?

Any advice appreciated


Paul

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 8:53 am 
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Hi Paul
We are having a extension built at the moment and part of that is for a new kitchen, we are going to order our kitchen units from http://www.diy-kitchens.com/
The one that we like is a painted MDF handle less mat finish look that we think will see us out .
We also liked the fact that they sell 900 high wall units which we like as there is a strong possibility that the shorter ones would get all sorts of clutter put on top of them.
I also like that they make their units in rigid form so there are no missing bits to chase up.

I've seen some of the crap kitchens that other people have fitted and some of the shiney gloss white ones have de laminated and look awful.
I know that the finished kitchen is all down to the quality of the way it is fitted but I would rather start off with good units in the first place.

Mike

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2016 8:55 am 
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Door finishes are important too get right. Real wood finishes look really old fashioned now, even light oak. Shiny gloss still looks good and painted finishes are common but you have to be careful on colours as these can date quickly. The doors to avoid are cheaper foil finishes which is a heat shrunk stuck plasticc type veneer over an MDF core. These look cheap and can delaminate or bubble looking awful.

So to answer your question simply a lacquer could go on a natural wood finish or a resin based gloss finish, painted is fairly obvious and foil wrapped is as stated above. With kitchens I think you need to pick something as neutral as possible as the average kitchen lasts 12 to 15 years before it looks so bleedin' awful you have to change it. Spend a bit of time thinking through the whole range of finishes like worktops, tiles and flooring a well as cornice and pelmets. It is often cheaper to buy worktops elsewhere as the big profits are made on these at kitchen suppliers.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 12:37 am 
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If u can stretch to I always fit painted. As it achieves a better finish. Avoid laminated foil type.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 2:50 pm 
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Hi Paul,

I have been a fitter for B&Q for the last 3 years out of there Radlett branch which covers east anglia and london, as well as supplying my own kitchens for the last 13 years.

To answer your question it would depend on the door your looking to get. A high gloss door can come in all three, with painted and lacquered being the better of the options. As for the rest as stated above avoid foil laminated as over time (sometimes less time if on a dishwasher or next to wet or hot areas) will peel away.

Word of advice regarding B&Q, make them tell you what every item on the quote is, as i have found they like to add all sorts of little things in there you don't know or didn't need to get.
Also i find installation is way overpriced of which we would usually clear around 35-40% of what they charge you. And again there will all ways be items in there that might not be required.
Regarding worktops avoid gemstone, it is without doubt the worst product they sell. Solid surface granite or quartz are double the price of local stone mason.



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 9:35 pm 
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Excellent info Leighton ,really appreciate your input and will take it into account when I get the quote

Paul


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 2:31 pm 
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I went with DIY Kitchens and was well happy. We got Langham painted door fronts, made from ash and painted in Blue Ground.

If you're thinking of buying from them then this might help :)

All come out really nicely and reasonably priced, 16 units came to £6050 including the 2 man delivery, panels, plinths, etc etc. that included no worktops.

Of those 16 units, 5 were wall cupboards, 1 sink cupboard and then the other 10 all had either soft close drawers or wirework in. 22 drawers in total and 2 tall larder units with the wirework.

With the construction they use, the drawers and wirework the units are HEAVY. I gladly paid the extra just so that I couldn't be blamed if one got bounced. All you need to do is nail the legs on and do the handles. And get rid of a ton of cardboard.

I did find that the screws they included were about 3mm too short to contact the handle, so bought some longer ones since it was over the xmas period while they were shut down. They did offer to send new ones out after xmas by which point it was too late.

We're both well pleased with the finished article as it everyone that's seen it :)


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