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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:04 pm 
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I've got powerful 18v combi drills and drivers, but I've also become quite keen on some additional compact lightweight models (e.g. little 18V hex drivers and drills). However, my batteries are DeWalt, and they don't seem so hot on small tools - at least not without dropping down a voltage. With the low weight (and ageing characteristics) of batteries these days, I didn't really want to run a second type in parallel.

I'm wondering if this is a trend or perhaps even policy, though. DeWalt is obviously pushing the bigger flexivolt stuff, and their take on 'compact' in 18v appears aimed at reducing the size of the powerful stuff; not so much making genuinely small, lighter versions. So perhaps I should begin to look at a different battery and/or brand for the smaller end of things anyway, in which case possibly 10.8v/12v would make most sense.

I'm mostly just interested in what people think, or if this is just my perception. I'm not about to rush out and buy loads of specific stuff, but I would make different choices in some upcoming purchases if an additional make or voltage seems on the cards for the near future.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:18 pm 
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i have loads off bosch 10.8/12v stuff
apart from the usual drivers and buzzy toy
the special bits are jigsaw mini saw mini angle-grinder light router :lol:
they tend to be lower geared to give compact and light but at a slower rate off progress

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:47 pm 
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Yes, thats the sort of thing I was wondering about, really. AFAIK theres no actual reason why smaller, less powerful (and lower geared) motors couldn't be made for 18v too, and some brands appear to - given (e.g.) a 1.5Ah battery's small size and weight it seems quite reasonable. But it is less common and I suppose its understandable that manufacturers may choose to make smaller tools for their lower voltages only.

I wouldn't need a great range like you have, but there are several tools that I may ultimately prefer in smaller sizes. Perhaps its no biggie, the slightly lower tool prices (and not wearing out the more costly ones on more routine jobs) may make up for the additional batteries needed.

I discovered the UHM youtube channel the other day, and theres a little (probably milwaukee) 12v drill/driver often in use that seems perfect for all but the heavier duty jobs, really quite surprising actually.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:02 pm 
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modern li-ion batteries and brushless motors allow twice the power off say 5 years ago
my old 3 speed dewalt was about 420w the new one is about 830w
http://www.dewalt.co.uk/products/Brushl ... river.html

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:56 pm 
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I'm probably behind the times there - I've been using 18v for a while now, my last lower voltage driver was at least a decade old and that wasn't bad so things must be even better now.

As an aside, I've got a predecessor (though still brushless) high-ish end model to the 18v one in your link. Its very impressive, done a fair bit of stainless and large masonry drilling with it, big hole-saws and similar - its still going strong. But its not great with small screws though; aside from the weight & bulk, the electronic clutch can become confused sometimes and seriously overdo it, without warning. All in all, a smaller, newer and perhaps cheaper model may be more appropriate for those kind of jobs.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 11:25 pm 
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it says the 996[830w] is 26% better than the 995[650w] which matches :lol:
the electronic clutch seems novel but seems good in the fact once reached the power stops until you reset the trigger
the bright work light staying on for 20 mins could be handy in confined spaces

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 9:00 am 
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you also talk about 1.5ah batteries these are great for lighter work but iff you are doing the same work as a 18v drill because the fuel-tank is only 3/5ths the size[3v x3.6v] a 1.5v would be 0.9ah for the equivillent work off a 18v drill
or turn it round a 3ah battery at 18v would need 5ah battery at 10.8v or a 5ah battery would need 8.3ah at 10.8v for the same amount off work

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:25 am 
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Yes, I understand the power reserves involved, that is another reason I didn't really want to drop a voltage (though mainly for compatibility reasons). I see the DeWalt website's smallest 18v battery is now 2Ah though, so here too it looks like the smaller batteries are being gradually dropped or upgraded (rather than being made smaller).

To be fair to it, the 995 it is pretty versatile really - just unnecessarily big and heavy for many things. That and I've found the electronic clutch too untrustworthy on smaller screws, so I end up using an impact driver instead. Thats often overkill too of course, but DeWalt seem not to do plain/normal drivers in 18V, just impact types, which is a bit disappointing.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:36 am 
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Use the 18v dewalt stuff for most things myself, but I did get the 10.8v dewalt drill driver / impact driver set.

The impact driver hasn't seen much use but the 10.8v drill driver is so useful. It's plenty powerful and the battery lasts sufficiently well in my experience plus there is also the spare from the impact driver.

For long days working kitchen fitting etc it is noticeably lighter and easier on the wrists etc but still has plenty of grunt. I use it more than the 18v day to day. In masonry I'd stick to 18v but the little 10.8 definitely has its place.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:38 am 
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P.s. the10.8v battery goes onto the standard 18v charger too, so you don't need to carry extra chargers around.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:53 am 
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Thanks, thats good to hear. It was screw-driving that started me off down this line of thought, there just doesn't seem anything very suitable in their 18V range, compared to other brands.

Perhaps a small drill/driver and maybe a (non-impact) hex driver would do me really, 18v seems fine for other stuff.

Yeah the battery/charger compatibility would be useful. Whether thats enough to hold me to DeWalt depends on prices and range really, I shall have to see whats available.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:26 pm 
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Have been looking around at various tools today, and realised my main frustration is not with the voltage, but that DeWalt don't choose to do a normal/dedicated driver in 18V. (just quite big drill-drivers, impact drivers (with no clutch), and dry-wall drivers). TBH I still find that a strange omission.

So I may buy into makita's 18v range, since they don't have this apparent blind spot. Or else get a 10.8v/12v driver and just a few small batteries in some decent brand, as it adds extra possibilities for future smaller/cheaper tools.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:48 pm 
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drill drivers are the same thing
hammer/percussion is usually a further level on top off a drill driver to giver a hammer drill
what exactly are you looking for and do you have another make as an example to help my very old very confused brain :dunno: :lol:
just note it may just be confusion caused by different termanoligy and descriptions between manufacturers and indeed different forums groups ect :lol:

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:18 am 
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So many terms, and some overlap, yes - I should have been clearer. This is one example of what I mean by a driver:
Image
It may have a hex-socket or chuck but fundamentally it is very suited to screw driving - torque/clutch control for small screws, very light and compact. Probably not that fast in terms of RPM, though even better if also 2-speed and usable for light drilling (such as screw-clearance sized holes), in which case it'd be a small drill/driver in my reckoning.

That picture happens to be an 18v version. My disappointment with DeWalt's 18v range is that there is no such thing (not even a similarly modest drill/driver) - they only offer them in 10.8v. In 18v all their general drivers are impact drivers with no clutch/torque-control, or else relatively large, powerful drill/drivers - both of which I already have but seem excessively bulky (and costly to wear out) for a great many routine screw-related jobs, and (perhaps more importantly) the big drill/driver also isn't reliable with small screws.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 11:37 am 
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i suppose the answer is they have the 10.8v option
and the cost off a compact naked 18v driver will be similar to a 10.8 with 2 batteries so no real cost advantage :dunno:

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