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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:38 pm 
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big-all wrote:
the orange plastic bit should be the positive locating at given points does it not sit in tight ??


It does but then the table is out by a fair margin (btw the sand paper is idea forgot to mention that).

My guess is the table has been moving under load when cutting, this would certainly account for wavy line issue, Dropped tech support an email before tinkering with back fence, there are Allen bolts which might offer adjustment on this.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:37 pm 
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The finish, the middle one has been kicking around for a while?

Its mill finish, there will be deviations- depending on how its been stored, where its been stored...

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:13 am 
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Hitch wrote:
The finish, the middle one has been kicking around for a while?

Its mill finish, there will be deviations- depending on how its been stored, where its been stored...


Updated (edited)

That's the one I have been polishing lol, 400 wet n dry, red scotch, green scotch ...then... baby oil, that stuff removes some of the oxidization but dulls after a while.

RE: previous post blade alignment, all sorted.

Here is what was happening causing intermittent cutting issues.

Releasing the orange handle lets you move the table around, as mentioned above this meant the TAPERED (this is important) peg sat to one side of the notch. unbeknownst to me ..ahhammm.. the lever also acts as part of the base with its own leg support. When using on my small bench this leg didn't make contact as the other four main base legs felt sufficient, of course when the table was subsequently moved outside it came into play. After or possibly during cuts the vibration would push the peg into the rotating the table out of square....again.. and..again..

Not sure if I feel daft or elated at spotting it, anyhooo.. removed fence and squared up properly with peg now firmly home.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 2:53 pm 
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Final update.

All good, everything square with no wavy cuts.

On the subject of polishing, contacted suppliers to ascertain finish. Nothing conclusive other than std milled finish, this is possible as the lines may just be a reflection (excuse pun) of the drawn process..but i also think it has some sort of coating, reason being once sanded it becomes much more susceptible to graying or finger prints.

in essence it needs resealing, lots of really good cleaners but leave it open to oxidization or graying, after trying various compounds from the garage I found Solvol to be excellent. end result is very close to original 'white' but with more of a satin appearance.

The two far ones are finished with Solvol, nearest stock - untouched..

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:06 am 
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Alloy ally wrote:
fully share your skepticism on Silverline, it was the only one I could find dedicated to alloy without a bit of multipurpose being thrown in.

Actually pretty much ANY mitre saw blade marked as TCG (triple chip grind) is designed for aluminium. They are often not sold specifically as aluminium blades as they are just as often used for cutting fine hardwoods or laminated man-made materials

Alloy ally wrote:
After getting some nice clean 90 degree cuts this problem suddenly returned making a real hash of things. It couldn't be the table as this had been squared at least three times, checked it again - miles out, the table is moving when the machine is being moved !

This particular machine has a friction lock which binds to the underside of casting, not sure why but not holding firm - when moving I lock the arm/motor in down position and use that to carry, so not even touching base.

Sorry to say, but you've now discovered the difference between a DIY quality mitre saw and a tradesman's saw. Cutting metal (even a soft one like ally) is a lot harder on the saw than cutting MDF or softwood and a plastic detente peg isn't going to wear well when cutting metals. The kit they generally use in metalwork shops to cut metals is far heavier than even trade mitre saws - stuff like induction-motored Omga saws, etc

As to the blades lasting - my own experiences of using Silverline blades is that the life is less than half of that of decent quality blades and the cut quality is often nowhere near as good. The resharpening guys don't seem that impressed with them, either (something to do with the carbide being coarse and brittle). I gave up on them for anything other than ripping-up old, nail-ridden floors a while back. Just a tradies view

Alloy ally wrote:
On the subject of polishing, contacted suppliers to ascertain finish. Nothing conclusive other than std milled finish, this is possible as the lines may just be a reflection (excuse pun) of the drawn process..but i also think it has some sort of coating, reason being once sanded it becomes much more susceptible to graying or finger prints.

The aluminium profile we use often comes with an anodised finish, but where it doesn't there sometimes appears to be some sort of lacquer coating which keeps the surfaces looking bright. That said it's just as likely that your extruded aluminium will simply have a thin coat of oil from the extrusion process left over and that by merely handling it you are removing this and exposing the surface of the metal to the air. Scratch through the surface oxides (sanding, abrasive polishing, etc) or protective coating and aluminium will naturally oxidise to a dull grey colour relatively quickly. The only ways to avoid this are to either use anodised materials in the first place, or to seal any bare surface with a clear lacquer or the like as soon as you have processed it.

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For this message the author Job and Knock has received gratitude : Alloy ally
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 8:08 pm 
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Job, ta for the reply

With regard to:

Blades

It's probably a little unfair for me to make a comparison between the two blades given previous set-up being off kilter. That said, working well so far - did quite a big batch today around 3m into 100mm sections, so far, so good.

It stuck in my mind that more teeth equals finer cut, certainly with hand saws this tends to be true but not sure otherwise, lots of other factors to consider (rpms)

DIY mitre saw

It definitely lacks finesse that's for sure; example when using to cut a mitre the lock-down bolt engages every time making it impossible to bring the blade up - there's no twist lock on the bolt...and back to table..

This strikes me as odd, effectively you can only rotate the table to the pre-determined settings (or notches) anything else and the leg protrudes leading to above issues or wobbling..

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:07 am 
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Alloy ally wrote:
It stuck in my mind that more teeth equals finer cut, certainly with hand saws this tends to be true but not sure otherwise, lots of other factors to consider (rpms)

There is a sort of law of diminishing returns on this - yes, more teeth = finer cut.... up to a point, but when you pass that point the gullet size becomes too small to carry the swarf produced resulting in some being carried round again in the blade which ultimately results in the blade getting hotter (caused by friction). Some cures when this starts to happen are to feed in less aggressively, to use a lubricant or anti-stick compound on the blade from time to time (e.g. Trendiwax) and maybe consider a form of dust extraction to help clear the chips.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 pm 
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Yup, need to get some blade lubrication as mentioned by other posters.

If i decide to do anymore of these will probably opt for a band saw as already suggested, any thoughts on the angled type band saw v say 9" upright featured in video link below?

Dust seems to be a lot more localized on upright table.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 9:10 am 
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The horizontal bandsaw is designed to cut off long pieces to length, the vertical bandsaw isn't. Horiontal band saws type work a lot more like a chop saw. On a vertical bandsaw you have a relatively sloppy and inaccurate mitre fence and no way of supporting long length of stock as you feed through tyhe blade

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:14 pm 
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Thanks, I eliminated the vertical option due to the tilting table, this initially looked ideal until you start working with 3000mm channel lengths, would need a very tall stand : )

There's a great video of the Aldi jobbie here which made me laff, his comments at the end regarding Evo mitre saw are similar to my own - very well summed up imo.



Narrowed the choice down to two, Aldi and Axminster below - both have consistently good reviews but obvious price difference.

https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-model-engineer-series-mcb115shd-swivel-head-metal-cutting-bandsaw-700103


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 3:19 pm 
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The only thing I'd say is that Axminster is more likely to stand by their product in terms of support, etc in the longer term. In terms of speed/volume, though, a mitre saw will give you greater throughput than a bandsaw on soft metals - it's just that you need to look at heavier saws than a DIY mitre saw, ideally with induction motors, to get what you need. Were I on a budget I'd be on the lookout for a secondhand Elektra-Beckum or possibly one of the newer generation of large blade metal-cutting chop saws (e.g. deWalt DW872, Makita LC1230, etc) if there wasn't the budget for a heavy saw like an Omga.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 8:25 pm 
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Yup, looked at the larger metal chop saws as fairly impressive cutting with little fuss.

Price wise the Makita looks fine although not 100% sure if it would take large stock say 3000mm at 45 degrees. Each section has two 45 degree cuts, so cut one way then flip over to get the second - that would be ideal if able to feed stock through without obstruction.

There's a video here where chap mentions aluminium possibly causing warranty issues due to flakes blocking blade.

Don't really need a base, so on the bandsaw front the cheaper Aldi should do the trick - I also wondered if it would easier to line up with cutting marks given thinner blade, sometimes with the chop saw it can be tricky getting the blade to come down exactly where you want it.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:12 pm 
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Alloy ally wrote:
There's a video here where chap mentions aluminium possibly causing warranty issues

Hmmm. Looks like that's the case. I've really only used this type of saw to cut cast bronze/cast brass stair nosings and never really looked at the instruction manuals - where it does indeed say the saws are not to be used for cutting aluminium. I wonder if swapping to a triple chip aluminium blade would cure this?

I have to say that the main saws I've used for ally profile cutting in the past were woodworking mitre saws fitted with an appropriate (TCG) blade - but a trade type saw, not a DIY one (Makita LS1040, etc) and they worked well enough for my needs. Even with the right blade you get some ally hung-up on the blades (normally behind the teeth on the plate if the saw) so you do need to check this from time to time as leaving them there will result in a rough cut

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:40 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
Alloy ally wrote:
There's a video here where chap mentions aluminium possibly causing warranty issues

Hmmm. Looks like that's the case. I've really only used this type of saw to cut cast bronze/cast brass stair nosings and never really looked at the instruction manuals - where it does indeed say the saws are not to be used for cutting aluminium. I wonder if swapping to a triple chip aluminium blade would cure this?

I have to say that the main saws I've used for ally profile cutting in the past were woodworking mitre saws fitted with an appropriate (TCG) blade - but a trade type saw, not a DIY one (Makita LS1040, etc) and they worked well enough for my needs. Even with the right blade you get some ally hung-up on the blades (normally behind the teeth on the plate if the saw) so you do need to check this from time to time as leaving them there will result in a rough cut


May be it's the dust rather than resistance/hardness of material, perhaps contact with brushes could ignite - no idea, this video made me think twice though. second post down by - ultimatehandyman

http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/forum1/6mm-aluminium-with-hand-tools-t95155.html

It reminds me of magnesium.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:15 pm 
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Thinking this through, it could be due to blade size and possible binding of swarf to surface. Wouldn't take a lot to knock this off balance causing vibration, associated problems.


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