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 Post subject: Cut back eaves detail
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:52 am 
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Hello,

I' currently renovating a 70's house and the architect has proposed taking back the eaves for a more modern architectural look. Regardless of how you feel about it aesthetically, I was wondering about the detail he's proposed.

Here's a pic of the eaves and the survey as is, and then the detail which you can see my comments in red. Is the nilvent straight into the gutter a normal practice? Seems to me it would catch in the wind and fail over time. I thought an angled metal flashing would make more sense.

Appreciate your thoughts

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:46 pm 
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And you'd need a lintel and two courses of brickwork above that window. Or a flashing & a free issue cavity leak. Architects :roll:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:59 pm 
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Cantseeitfrommyhouse wrote:
And you'd need a lintel and two courses of brickwork above that window. Or a flashing & a free issue cavity leak. Architects :roll:

You wouldn’t need a lintel or two course of bricks as the rafter would be cut back flush with the outside skin of brickwork. The existing soffit and fascia would be removed and the first couple of rows of tile then the rafter would be cut flush with brick then a new fascia fixed to rafters which would then take the new guttering.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:21 pm 
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Cantseeitfrommyhouse wrote:
And you'd need a lintel and two courses of brickwork above that window. Or a flashing & a free issue cavity leak. Architects :roll:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:39 pm 
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A fee issue cavity leak? Never heard of that. Is that architects speak?

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:05 pm 
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your modern architec style will end up lookin like a 1950's council house. what you propose is a well bad idea. the drawing is out to lunch an would only give problems.
some bldg depts make you design in a protective overhang.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:55 am 
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:lol: I was expecting a bit of architect bashing!

Steviejoiner74 -I think you nailed it - cut back rafter to the brick outer edge, not inner as he's drawn and perhaps use an aluminium fascia for a very low profile look.

Leaving the aesthetic aside, is it ok/usual to take the nilvent straight into the gutter. I was expecting either a metal apron flashing or 'eaves protection strip' I think they're called, lapped under the nilvent to transfer any water under the tiles into the gutter.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:01 am 
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Mobius wrote:
:lol: I was expecting a bit of architect bashing!

Leaving the aesthetic aside, is it ok/usual to take the nilvent straight into the gutter. I was expecting either a metal apron flashing or 'eaves protection strip' I think they're called, lapped under the nilvent to transfer any water under the tiles into the gutter.


Yes a metal flashing would be better. Nilvent is not meant to be left exposed in perpetuity.

If you're using aluminium as a fascia you'll want to be using an appropriate guage of material, >2mm and secret fixing, bonded butt straps etc. Face fixing through light guage ali looks...well... :puke:

Re: gutter... the front edge of the gutter should be lower than the back edge; especially if you're mounting it at the same height as the outer skin of brickwork, as if it blocks and overflows you want it to pour off the front edge not down the cavity.


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