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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 8:22 pm 
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Hello everyone,

I have a quick query. I'm doing a HSL at the weekend. Ceilings (silk- don't ask!), anagypta paper to be hung and emulsioned, gloss on all of trim.

What is the correct order of work when painting over paper? Obviosuly its the norm to get the ceiling on first but in this case would it be better to paper first?

1. Prep
2. Paper Walls
3. Paint Ceiling
4. Paint Walls
5. Gloss

How would you pros normally tackle this

Cheers!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 8:33 pm 
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swap 2 and 3. ceiling then paper.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:35 am 
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When papering to then emulsion it, I treat the paper as if it were a 'skim'
so I paper, paint ceiling fading the paint slightly on the the paper to fill
the joint (or even caulk the ceiling line) Just makes the ceiling/wall
transition continuous white so that if the cutting in isn't perfect it's less
likely to show.
I'd paint the woodwork to for the same reason, then walls.
I also find it's easier to wipe emulsion mistakes off WW rather
than paint off emulsion!

Not saying it's right, just the way it works for me.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 4:09 pm 
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If you paint the woodwork before the walls, and you get any gloss on the wall, you will find the emulsion doesn't "stick" as well to the gloss. It's worth taking some time to learn how to cut in properly and easily.

There are lots of different ways to do something, but there is only one best way so, as wine~o said:

1. Prep
2. Paint Ceiling
3. Paper Walls
4. Paint Walls
5. Gloss


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 4:47 pm 
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What order do you recommend if spraying trim?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 5:11 pm 
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Quote:
What order do you recommend if spraying trim?


Someone else will need to answer that as I don't user a sprayer.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:24 pm 
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Tom d'Angler wrote:
If you paint the woodwork before the walls, and you get any gloss on the wall, you will find the emulsion doesn't "stick" as well to the gloss. It's worth taking some time to learn how to cut in properly and easily.

There are lots of different ways to do something, but there is only one best way so, as wine~o said:

1. Prep
2. Paint Ceiling
3. Paper Walls
4. Paint Walls
5. Gloss


At what point would you apply the undercoat on the WW?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:38 pm 
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Quote:
At what point would you apply the undercoat on the WW?


Good question.

In this case, because it is a HSL, I would undercoat the woodwork in between 4. and 5.

If it is a smaller room that would take, say, three days I would:

1. Prep
2. Paper walls
3. First coat ceiling
4. First coat walls
5. Undercoat woodwork
6. Second coat ceiling
7. Second coat walls
8. Topcoat woodwork


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:40 pm 
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If you have picture rails does that alter the order at all?
Also paint above picture rail ceiling colour or wall colour? (I've done it ceiling colour)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:48 pm 
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Quote:
If you have picture rails does that alter the order at all?


Although I generally work top to bottom, I would do the picture rail when I do the other woodwork.

Quote:
Also paint above picture rail ceiling colour or wall colour? (I've done it ceiling colour)


Ceiling colour is "traditional" for the wall above the picture rail. I don't know why that is the case, maybe someone can enlighten us? Something to do with the Victorian way of doing things I suppose?


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:54 pm 
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Tom d'Angler wrote:
Quote:
At what point would you apply the undercoat on the WW?


Good question.

In this case, because it is a HSL, I would undercoat the woodwork in between 4. and 5.

If it is a smaller room that would take, say, three days I would:

1. Prep
2. Paper walls
3. First coat ceiling
4. First coat walls
5. Undercoat woodwork
6. Second coat ceiling
7. Second coat walls
8. Topcoat woodwork


Great thanks for the help.

One more question, this time on Anaglypta paper which I have never hung before. Whats the best way to get neat corners (internal & outside) with a thick paper like this? double cut the corners? How much would you over lap 25mm, 50mm? Hope this makes sense


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:10 am 
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Quote:
One more question, this time on Anaglypta paper which I have never hung before. Whats the best way to get neat corners (internal & outside) with a thick paper like this? double cut the corners? How much would you over lap 25mm, 50mm? Hope this makes sense


Yes, it makes perfect sense. The best way for you to get an idea about how to do this is to watch some videos on YouTube. There are lots of videos on there about hanging wallpaper. Some of them are really good and some of them are rubbish. You'll be able to tell which ones are the good ones by reading the comments below each video. Bad ones attract lots of negative comments from decorators and good ones attract good comments. Have a trawl through, find a couple of good ones, and you'll pick up some ideas.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 7:19 am 
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Internal corners are best cut around 15mm wider than the corner. If the pattern is critical, you can cut a second length and 'recover' the piece of the pattern which is on the adjacent wall (the 15mm wrap) to make sure the pattern matches exactly. Very dependent on how plumb the corner is, though if you have the pattern correct at eye-level, any discrepancies of a bad wall are mitigated by this. Bad walls are bad walls.

External corners and/or radiuses are a wee bit different. With an embossed paper, you really can't overlap and must splice the joint. Again, pattern and straightness of the corner play a part on how this is best achieved. Also, it's best to not to splice on the most visually prominent side of the corner. Most externals, either by light source or viewing angle, will have a blind(er) side to them. Best to cut around the corner into this area, re-plumb and splice where the joint will be less visible. 25-30mm around an external is best, as the paper needs to grip and not lift.

There are a lot of variables in this process, and you have to adapt to the situation you have. Hope this makes sense. :thumbright:

BTW - Ready-mixed paste makes a lot of this much easier.

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