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PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 1:17 am 
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Hi all,
Have posted about our problems another topic with a 1930s semi we have.

I really need to know how cavity wall insulation can be removed (we have the white fluffy stuff), who can do it for me, and how much it would cost???

Want to get rid as the previous owners (elderly couple) had it put in but I think it is contributing towards our damp problems. In 3 areas, when I've removed the air bricks, around the house and the material is very wet towards the floor though dry further up. Not obvious what the cause is but these old houses were designed to breathe.

We do get a lot of wind driven rain being backed onto a park and near the coast plus our house is slightly below the park level which gets a lot of rain with few drains!


Any ideas?

Thanks
N


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 11:14 am 
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Hi Nick,

I presume the house is of brick construction? I think the only way of doing it will be to remove bricks above DPC and vacumming the stuff out.

S

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 11:29 am 
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It is probably urea formaldehyde foam which was used a lot in the 60's. Pockets in the foam form damp bridges that allow moisture to trickle down from external to internal wall. Similarly any damp coming through the external wall cannot evaporate so it will run down the wall and puddle on the damp course. It might be worth drilling a few weep holes on the affected areas and see if that helps.

This firm say they can remove the old stuff and replace with new. As it will be eligible for a grant(they say) it might be worth asking for a quote http://www.glowarminsulations.co.uk/WallInsRemoval.htm

Keep us posted as this might be of interest to others in a similar position.

DWD



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:30 am 
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Thanks both. It looks like you're right. Brick removal and an industrial vacuum cleaner. I am becoming slightly more convinced that its not the main culprit for our damp issues but rather that it isn't helping.

I tried Glowarm but they dont cover the north west :-(

I have managed to shift a lot of it with help from a builder mate but still a lot in there.

Cheers


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