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 Post subject: burst pipe in the loft
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 1:48 am 
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After a burst pipe in the loft
I intend to hire or buy a dehumidifier should I get one for each floor (Two floors) or just one to cover the whole house. If just one what is the best place to situate it? I am thinking just one on the top landing. I will leave the heating on full for a couple of weeks with the dehumidifier running and with all the internal doors wedged open. The warm moist air will rise so the top landing would be a good intersect point.

The kicker is the water runoff as the machine (or machines if two are hired, or bought) will be left unattended overnight perhaps longer. What’s the best option?

I am thinking of tapping into the bath waste as its low down and adding an appliance spigot which I can then add a hose onto which will attach to the Dehumidifier. I can patch that up later after its all done.

If I need a Dehumidifier on each floor I could use an air vent in the Livingroom that is a legacy to the old back boiler (removed two years ago, replaced by a combi) to run a hose pipe outside. There is still an outside chance that could freeze though so I would need to insulate it.

The model I am looking at is the Broughton CR40 Heavy Duty Industrial Dehumidifier 230V
Bought for £400 (it could be useful going forward, or ebay sell it when I am done)
Rent for £60 a week (might need it for longer than a week though)

Please read on as to why I need to hire this
I have had a burst pipe in the loft area of an empty two bedroom mid terraced house. This was allowed to run for several hours (at least 8) before the water was shut off at the main stopcock. The whole house got a thorough soaking. Even after the water was turned off water was still pouring through the ceilings on both floors mainly from the lights and smoke detectors. After 30mins it has begun to slow down but hadn’t stopped completely.
I have left it like that for the moment (Power turned off, water turned off)
I will be back on Tuesday to begin cleaning up.
What I intend to do
All the loft insulation will be discarded as it is saturated. I will leave the loft uninsulated for a week or so to allow the rafters, joists and the ceiling plasterboards to dry before having new loft insulation laid.
The carpets to the upstairs will be discarded (They are not new 5+ years old so I am okay with that). I will also lift a few floorboards in both bedrooms and the top landing to allow air to circulate in the void between the down stairs ceiling and upstairs floorboards. I will also remove all the crap that will be in that void as best I can.
The downstairs is all laminate flooring, when I left it was covered in approximately a 10mm of water.
I will rip that up as there could be water trapped between the laminate and the insulation below it, this will allow the floor boards to dry I will also remove a few boards to allow air in under the floor. I don’t want dry rot getting in to the joists.


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 Post subject: burst pipe in the loft
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:16 am 
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Sounds like substantial water damage - you not got insurance? Would probably need all ceiling plasterboard & possibly wall replacing as well? Wall insulation soaked too?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:58 am 
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How high is the output of the machine? You could sit it in the bath and let it drain, or prop it up on a couple of boxes and run the pipe into the bath for drainage. One machine should be enough for a standard house, I would suggest a fan or two though to keep the air moving around.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:58 am 
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We have a flood years back. You're plan sounds like a good idea but I'd get some fans too.

You will just have to set how it's drying out and move fans and machine around periodically. You will be surprised how fast it does out. Given your redoing the house I'd lift a good deal of boards to let air circulate. laminate will have to be dumped.

Tought break!

PS: if you're using an extension lead and high watt device remember to unwind the reel fully.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 12:41 am 
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Rorschach wrote:
How high is the output of the machine? You could sit it in the bath and let it drain, or prop it up on a couple of boxes and run the pipe into the bath for drainage. One machine should be enough for a standard house, I would suggest a fan or two though to keep the air moving around.


Hi Rorschach
The output is
Extraction: 11.25L/24hrs @ 70%RH/20 C
Extraction: 38.01L/24hrs @ 100%RH/35 C

I didn't think of a fan so I will add it to my list, thanks
I did think of raising the unit up to run the waste to the bath or running in down to the kitchen sink. There are options in that area, I will figure it out once I am on the job.

Cheers
James

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 12:54 am 
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DIY_Johnny wrote:
We have a flood years back. You're plan sounds like a good idea but I'd get some fans too.

You will just have to set how it's drying out and move fans and machine around periodically. You will be surprised how fast it does out. Given your redoing the house I'd lift a good deal of boards to let air circulate. laminate will have to be dumped.

Tought break!

PS: if you're using an extension lead and high watt device remember to unwind the reel fully.


Thanks DIY_Johnny
Fans, yep I am on it, good tip from both you and Rorschach I hadn't considered fans so it goes to show asking for advice and opinions can help.

Also, yes to the extension reel if it's needed, I will spool it all out. I don't need a fire on top of this mess.
The unit draws "Nominal Running Current: 1.3A (230v)"
So it's not a massive current but its best to stay safe as its being left unattended overnight.

Cheers
James

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 1:16 am 
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getthewheelsinline wrote:
Sounds like substantial water damage - you not got insurance? Would probably need all ceiling plasterboard & possibly wall replacing as well? Wall insulation soaked too?


Hi getthewheelsinline
Yes to insurance but I would rather not claim it, if possible, it will ramp up my premiums going forward for years to come. Not just this property but all in the portfolio. Insurance will also want quotes from at least three builders to do the work when I can easily do it my self. I have all the kit.

You are probably correct on anything made of plasterboard needing tore down and replaced.

Cheers
James

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 6:29 am 
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Duck_Tape wrote:
Rorschach wrote:
How high is the output of the machine? You could sit it in the bath and let it drain, or prop it up on a couple of boxes and run the pipe into the bath for drainage. One machine should be enough for a standard house, I would suggest a fan or two though to keep the air moving around.


Hi Rorschach
The output is
Extraction: 11.25L/24hrs @ 70%RH/20 C
Extraction: 38.01L/24hrs @ 100%RH/35 C

I didn't think of a fan so I will add it to my list, thanks
I did think of raising the unit up to run the waste to the bath or running in down to the kitchen sink. There are options in that area, I will figure it out once I am on the job.

Cheers
James



My apologies, I was talking about the height of the output drain on the machine, so you can set it up to drain into a sink/bath without modifying the plumbing.

In general though, sounds like you have it all sorted to me. De humidifier, fans, whack the heating up as the dehumudifier will be more efficient and close windows/seal up vents to stop outside air getting in as much possible.



For this message the author Rorschach has received gratitude : Duck_Tape
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