DIY Forum

 

Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate Handyman Ultimate HandymanUltimate Handyman on Pinterest

 

DIY Forum/Home improvement advice forum

 

 

A-Z CONTENTS | DISCLAIMER | DIY VIDEO | HOME | SAFETY FIRST | FORUM RULES

It is currently Fri Oct 20, 2017 12:38 am
Visit Thermo worx


Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]




 

 


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:10 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
I have one of these coupling nuts, which is used to join two brake pipes together:

Image

What I want to do is also put a thread on the outside (any size thread it okay). The problem is I don't have a lathe or anything. I thought I could possibly grind the Hex flats down (these fit a 13mm spanner) so it is round and then thread with a hand die. The problem is, I think using an angle grinder it may be very difficult to achieve a round shape good enough for threading with a die. I was also wondering if the material the nut is made out of is likely to be extremely hard and almost impossible to thread by hand?

What is the best way of doing this at home without a lathe?


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on DeliciousShare on Google+
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:20 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:49 pm
Posts: 9405
Location: Oban
Has thanked: 326 times
Been thanked: 1660 times
Might be easier to start with a threaded rod and drill/tap the inside to whatever you're currently using.

_________________
sent from my laptop using my fingers - because we REALLY need to know where it's come from.....



For this message the author kellys_eye has received gratitude : Retired
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:23 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 1886
Location: Kent, Land of Apples and PYO
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 378 times
Get the correct adapter ? tbh I would only do it on a lathe then it would be boarder line if you had enough material to put a thread on the outside (depending on wall thickness) so imo I would make it from a new piece of material

what is this for exactly ? and what sizes do you need

edit. 13mm spanner it will be a M8 nut/thread But as you say it a brake fitting the are usually imperial with a unf threads unless its a motorcycle or a cable adjuster

If its for a fluid brake line get the correct fittings !!!!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:34 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:47 pm
Posts: 2578
Location: Fenay Bridge; Huddersfield.
Has thanked: 2328 times
Been thanked: 771 times
Hi,

Good luck.

Would something like this be of use;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-Pcs-12mm-Male-8mm-Female-Thread-15mm-Length-Tapping-Threaded-Insert/301708669117?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D38661%26meid%3D2c621a6264b9496f82f17863c63660de%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D301741341933

What's the internal thread?

Kind regards, Col.

_________________
https://sites.google.com/site/colinwoodhuddersfield/

SOME PEOPLE ARE SO POOR ALL THEY HAVE IS MONEY.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:56 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
flash22 wrote:
imo I would make it from a new piece of material

what is this for exactly ? and what sizes do you need


I don't think it's that simple to make a new piece. Brake pipe couplings are different to normal coupling nuts that join threaded bar. As you can see in this picture, there is a small hole channel in the centre:

Image

As for material thickness, I can't see that being an issue. Just think how thin and soft brake pipes are - particularity the copper ones.

As for purpose, the joining nuts go through a supporting bracket with a hole in it. I want a thread on the outside of the joining nut, so I can bolt is securely against the bracket. I could buy the proper thing for the car, but it would take a long time to arrive (special order) and I am too tight! Also I don't want to mess with any of the standard fixing on the car by making new brackets or drilling into the chassis and fitting p clips.

I would have thought it should be fairly simple just to be a thread on the outside of the joining nut?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:53 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 1886
Location: Kent, Land of Apples and PYO
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 378 times
It will be a unf thread, do not mess with brakes !! if you reduce that nut and thread it is likely to fracture it as it will be weakened, due to the hydraulic pressure what can be 500-1000 psi

where a you located ? most fittings are off the self or can be got with in 24 hours

brakes are not somewhere you cut corners or bodge it, at the end of the day you could kill someone or anybody in the vehicle


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:30 pm 
Offline
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:49 pm
Posts: 9405
Location: Oban
Has thanked: 326 times
Been thanked: 1660 times
Adam32 wrote:
I want a thread on the outside of the joining nut, so I can bolt is securely against the bracket.

Why?

Is that how it was in its original form? If not, why change something that a manufacturer spent good money on designing properly and fit for the purpose?

If you really want to secure the pipe then use p-clips (insulated).

_________________
sent from my laptop using my fingers - because we REALLY need to know where it's come from.....


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:35 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
flash22 wrote:
do not mess with brakes !! if you reduce that nut and thread it is likely to fracture it as it will be weakened


I really don't think it will make much difference. Again look how thin brake pipes are. The wall thickness of the nut is way thicker than brake pipe walls. Plus there is a considerable safety margin built into these things.

I'm going to have a go at grinding it as round as possible and see if I can put a thread on it with a hand die. It will be a bit of an experiment. Unless anybody can suggest a better way without access to a lathe?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:55 pm 
Online
Senior Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2015 7:20 pm
Posts: 2877
Has thanked: 869 times
Been thanked: 849 times
As already said by others.
Don't do it.
Use the right part.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 7:24 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 1886
Location: Kent, Land of Apples and PYO
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 378 times
copper hasn't been used in brake lines for years these fittings are just a bronze/brass/alloy mix cast your reducing the strength of the part a lot, by grinding it your changing the make up of the metal due to heat and also contaminating the material, as for wall thickness standard line is 3/16 the fitting will be 3/8 what is equivalent 9.52mm, outside nut A/F is 1/2 or 12.7mm by the time you reduce it to a round your down to 12mm or less that gives you a wall thickness of 1.75mm less the depth of the thread (M12 is the nearest die course is 1.75mm (10.8mm) or fine is 1.25 (10.2mm) so best ways with a fine M12 thread of min dia of 10.2mm

10.2mm - 9.52mm = 0.50 mm divide that by 2 = 0.25 wall thickness between the pit of the inner and outer threads assuming your Chinese die is to spec and you get it the thread dead straight and your grinding work is that of a tool maker

Hydraulic pressure will find the path of least resistance and it will find any weakness

Are you just trolling the forum, as your purposely avoiding direct questions


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 7:42 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
flash22 wrote:
copper hasn't been used in brake lines for years


Why do you say that. This is what I use throughout the vehicle and it is copper:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/7-5MTR-COPPER- ... B004O1KXOE


Seems a strange thing what you said about trolling. With all respect I posed a question about how to do something, not whether I should do it. I really did not want a safety lecture. But thanks for your help anyway.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 9:03 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:35 pm
Posts: 2377
Has thanked: 40 times
Been thanked: 535 times
You will find it hard to cut the threads with a die, those nuts are tough and usually work-hardened in the manufacturing process.

I also would not want to be making my own brake fittings, the most important part of a car needs to be treated with respect.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:36 pm 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
Rorschach wrote:
You will find it hard to cut the threads with a die, those nuts are tough and usually work-hardened in the manufacturing process.


That's what I thought, but I will give it a go.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:53 pm 
Offline
Senior Member

Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2014 6:27 pm
Posts: 124
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 26 times
Not withstanding the comments of other members, in your attempt to put a thread on the outside for the purpose of holding it in a bracket, you do not need to grind it round. Assuming that the material is soft enough to cut a thread, that only needs to be on the hex apexes and not across the flats.

Pray tell, what vehicle is this for? Some of us have motor trade experience.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:25 am 
Offline
Newly registered Member

Joined: Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:30 am
Posts: 38
Has thanked: 0 times
Been thanked: 0 times
On second thoughts I have seen online some brass connectors, which should be much easier to thread with the softer material


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Similar topics
   

Time zone: Europe/London [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Visit Hilti


 

 

 

News News Site map Site map SitemapIndex SitemapIndex RSS Feed RSS Feed Channel list Channel list
ultimatehandyman privacy policy

Contact

 

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

phpBB SEO