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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 8:16 pm 
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I'm almost ready to start fitting my new engineered wood flooring. It's 14mm thick (top layer oak 2mm and two layers pine(?) 12mm), 2.2m long and 18cm wide.

I was going to buy this: http://www.argos.co.uk/product/7153390 but it turns out it's a four day pre-order and I need it tomorrow... I found a tool shop that has it on their website but it's a good hour drive and I'm not sure they have it in stock. But they open at 7:30 so could call and check, don't mind the drive if that tool is good for the purpose. I'll probably have to cut four or five of those floorboards length-wise.

So basically I want to know if that tool is good for this job (providing they have it in stock) and what are the alternative in case they don't have it. I don't mind spending up to about £100.

What do you guys think I should do?


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 8:24 pm 
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A crosscut saw and a jigsaw will do the trick

A sliding square is useful

Most cuts are hidden anyway tbh



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 8:58 pm 
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http://www.screwfix.com/p/irwin-jack-un ... UQodxEwAjg
I'm a joiner and frankly 99% of cuts can be done with one , it's only 14mm thick so ripping isn't that much of a problem. As said most cuts are covered anyway and cutting face side up won't cause any spelching . Utting by hand is generally a little slower so cutting by hand is not only good experience there's less chance of making a mistake than there would be with power tools.



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:29 pm 
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I have a manual saw but I really don't fancy doing so much cutting by hand :cb

When cutting by hand or with a jigsaw, what is the best way to support the floorboard?



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 11:08 pm 
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A piece of wood would suffice

Sent from my C6603 using Tapatalk



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 11:45 pm 
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ok my thoughts
that saw is a waste off money because
its difficult to use
no flowing movement in use
has no other use
will not be a generally useful saw
a jigsaw or handsaw will do the same job
a powered mitre saw [like evolution rage] will have greater capacity and do perhaps 50 times the task for similar or slightly more outlay

edit
ok just realized it can do rip cuts buuuuttt
90% off rip cuts on laminate are not parallel so comments above still apply
thinking you can rip a parallel length will make installation easy it wont as the walls will not be parallel so will cause no end off problems :cb

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:25 am 
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rip cut - use a straight bit of timber and clamp it down to the board and use it as a guide for the jigsaw, edges are covered by the skirting or scotia and allows for a bit of a iffy cut/expansion gap



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 12:22 pm 
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tadaska wrote:
When cutting by hand or with a jigsaw, what is the best way to support the floorboard?


Never felt or needed anything more complicated than one of these,
http://s3.amazonaws.com/bvsystem_tmp/pa ... 1314124955
Mine doesn't have the central timber stretcher but it does have a piece fixed to two legs on the same side which turns it into a useful hop up. I cover the top with sacrificial ply which gets changed ever so often.



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