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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 11:35 pm 
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Hi
Can any one advise of a decent jigsaw blade for cutting bathroom end pannel units and plinth.
Thanks for any advice.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:17 am 
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Melamine faced boards are quite hard to cut cleanly and a jigsaw would probably cause a lot of tear out as the teeth move up and down.

Do you have access to a circular saw, you would get better results.

How much do you need to cut? For a small job you can't really beat a fine tooth handsaw, you can setup a guide to help you keep the cut straight.

Regardless of which method you use, apply 2 x masking tape along the ling you want to cut (keeping over hang on each side of the cut) on both sides of the board. Keep the good face down and mark out your cut line and cut with the good face down.



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:00 pm 
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if its a seen edge you probably want to mark the scribe onto masking tape on the panel. then using downward cutting blades and also set the blade to a slight undercut angle then any fine tuning can be made if necessary afterwards



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:26 pm 
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Thanks for the advice lads,

I have a combination of curved and streight cuts to do, so I will be using a combination of both tips.

Is there any chance you can recommend a fine tooth jig saw blade.

Cheers

ATB

Col


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:56 pm 
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I use the Bosch T101BIF laminate blades. Gives a nice clean cut

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 9:43 pm 
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For long straight cuts I have to agree that a sharp, fine tooth blade on a circular saw works best, especially if you have access to a rail saw (e.g. Festool for the trade or Parkside/Scheppch/Titan plunger for DIY) where the anti-splinter edge of the guide rails visibly improve the cut qulity.

The very best jigsaw blades for handling double faced melamine or veneered boards are made by Starrett:

Attachment:
Starrett Dual Cut Jigsaw Blades 001_01.JPG
Starrett Dual Cut Jigsaw Blades 001_01.JPG [ 25.57 KiB | Viewed 843 times ]


The BU3DC is for conventional straight cuts, whilst the BU3DCS2 is for fine curves. These blades can be found on eBay and the best outlet I know selling them is UK Jigsaw Blades in Halifax (above Charles Watson/Brandon Hire just off Pellon Lane if you are in the area - order over the phone if you need to collect as they have no counter). For notching out, scribes and the like these blades run absolute rings around every other blade on the market be they Bosch (Scintilla), Wilpu, Festool, Lenox, Mafell, etc. Unlike down cut blades (e.g. T101BR/T101BRF) they don't deflect anywhere near as much in the cut (I always found that the T101BR runs off square very quickly). Like any saw blade you'll only get good performance if you aren't forever pushing them round tight curves. Found these over 3 years back, tried them and never looked back for scribing-in laminated counters, reception desks, etc. Far too expensive for use as everyday blades, but for laminated/melamine coated work they really come into their own - anyone recommending T101BIF, T101BR, etc has obviously never tried these. Only available in T-shank fitting (or at least I thought that was all they'd fit until I saw the video below) and not for use with orbital mode engaged.

Here's a short infomercial on them, not sure I believe all the hype, but they are good blades:


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:37 pm 
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Thank you Job and Knock for taking the time to give me a very detailed answer to my question.

It is really appreciated. As is all the help I have received.

I have just watched the vid link and they look the businesses.

ATB

Col


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:02 am 
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those blades look really good jxk
just a though
if the neutral point on the blade doesnt line up with base plate quite closely if we assume a 1" stroke and the neutral point isnt close then it may be unballanced cutting :dunno:
as in the clamped blade to base distance will be a set distance on a jigsaw with half the stroke above and below if set neutral on the cut
with the 2 blades being off different length they cannot cut to an equal amount for both halves off the blade stroke
so if they both give exactly equal results on both top and bottom surfaces the the duel cut blade cannot be fully responsible but possibly how the teeth are formed

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 9:50 am 
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As odd as it sounds, I have had success clamping a thin piece of mdf to the laminated piece of wood that I am cutting. It stops the laminate breaking out when the jigsaw cuts it and a secondary benefit is it protects the surface from getting scratched as you pass the jigsaw over it - this is more where you cant cut from the other side.



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:26 pm 
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big-all wrote:
...if the neutral point on the blade doesnt line up with base plate quite closely if we assume a 1" stroke and the neutral point isnt close then it may be unballanced cutting :dunno:
as in the clamped blade to base distance will be a set distance on a jigsaw with half the stroke above and below if set neutral on the cut
with the 2 blades being off different length they cannot cut to an equal amount for both halves off the blade stroke
so if they both give exactly equal results on both top and bottom surfaces the the duel cut blade cannot be fully responsible but possibly how the teeth are formed

I think that you are overthinking it, B-A. Most MF-MDF is 18 or 22mm thick, most MFC is 15 to 22mm thick - and those blades are specifically designed for use on laminated boards. As long as the centre point (where the blade changes direction) remains more or less inside the material it is immaterial which direction the blade cuts in (remember you cannot use orbit with these blades). On thinner cuts it isn't necessarily doing that, but then MFC doesn't generally come much thinner than 15mm in panels (OK, there's 8mm drawer bottom stuff, but that is going into a groove so chip-out is not really an issue to contend with. In practice you find that they outperform pretty much anything on the market at their designed task - which is to cut melamine faced and laminated boards in the range (6 to 30mm thick for the straight cut saw, 4 to 20mm for the fine curve blade). They aren't really optimised for anything else. Get one, try it (on MFC or MF-MDF) and you'll probably be surprised

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:49 pm 
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yes i fully agree i overthink most things :lol:
i have a very inquisitive mind and i am very creative
i wasnt being critical just curious and interested in how and why it works
off course as you said the neutral point is within the material on any duel faced material :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:24 pm 
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Thanks for the input men. It is interesting.

Thank you for the advice on where to buy them from J&K I have just ordered a set and will let you know how I get on with them.

ATB

Col


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 8:09 pm 
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ill have to give those blades a bash j&k


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 5:13 pm 
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i'm with ahfix on this.
mark your line with a sharp pencil point.
use a fresh utility knife blade to cut the pencil line.
that cut will relieve the tension in the laminate, and you can then use a fresh hacksaw blade to cut the melamine or even a worktop.


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