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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 8:05 am 
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Hi,
Since we moved in to this bungalow four years ago, I've done the following electrical work:
1/ Ran armoured cable from house socket with RCD up garden to shed via two weatherproof boxes containing outdoor power sockets, and with a socket and lights in the shed itself.

2/ Installed several power socket spurs in house (not in bathroom), always making sure that the spur was not itself running from a spur.

3/Converted wi-fi broad PC and TV to Ethernet cable running in loft spaces and down or up walls.

4/ Installed inline extractor fan in ceiling void above shower in shower room, having cut into switch live cable by mistake, now being rectified.

5/ Replaced wall extractor fan in shower room with fan with built-in pull cord switch and timer. Such fans, as explained on this site in last post, do not provide for the timer to be run if the pull cord switch is used to operate the fan, as opposed to a light switch or other independent switch. Luckily, there's a workaround involving re-wiring the fan. This does, of course, invalidate the guarantee; but my point, with regard to possible breach of regulations, is that I have tampered with the actual fan wiring. It works, by the way, and I learnt how to re-wire the fan from an online sparky.

6/ Am still studying how to replace kitchen cooker re-circulating hood with extractor fan hood vented along ceiling void and through soffit. So assume that I have done the work.

I already know that according to the regulations I should at least call in a certified electrician to sign all this work off, or some of it.
My questions are as follows. I am, as I have just made clear, and as is obvious anyway from my posts on this site, a non-electrician who is aware of his limitations and always prepares for any electrical project by studying and asking questions, with others being asked as the work proceeds.
What I want to know is whether, in practice as opposed to theory, I run one of two risks.
The first is the risk of having any insurance claim rejected if, say, there's an electrical fire. What I want to know is how great is that risk, in practice. I emphasis in practice because I'm hoping I won't get replies that take no account of the actual risk, which could be very slight.
Secondly, I'd like to know, and I realise that this is a difficult question, what the risk is of my making a serious mistake when doing the kind of work I've listed.
I should point out that when I was installing the inline fan and looking at the wiring for the shower room lights, I found that the electrician had used block terminals with numerous cables having their wires twisted together and inserted into the blocks, the whole thing tied together with tape.
When I removed the tape one wire was loose and there were scorch marks on the cables, so that it all needs re-doing.
So I'll be asking advice yet again on this site.
My point is that the work was done by a qualified electrician and it was obvious, even to me, that it was unsafe.
There must be many thousands of DIY practitioners doing the kind of electrical work I've listed, so it would be very helpful to have a realistic assessment of risk, as I have asked for.
I know that the temptation, especially for electricians, will be to give a stern reply, but what I' hoping is that the replies will be informative and will go beyond the fact, as we all know it to be, that some of the work I've done should, according to the regulations, be signed off officially or even not done at all but left to qualified electricians to do.
Thanks for reading this, and I'd be very interested to know what the experts think.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 3:45 pm 
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Why do you single out electrical works as a DIY risk? Plumbing and building works have risks too.

There are thousands of houses in the UK with very old wiring and old fuse mains, do the insurers ask to rewire the house or refuse insurance?

As a landlord, you don't do DIY work when comes to risky jobs. There is no regulation yet in the rent sector regard electrics (there is for HMOs) apart from gas safety, smolke/fire alarms and EPC.

In your property, you are free what to do at your own risk. IMO.



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 4:40 pm 
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there more risk with plumbing tbh, a pipe Bursting can make a home inhabitable and cause deadly mould, sewage is even worse

In laymen's terms, your allowed to kill your self, but not kill anyone else - most of it is common sense, If your a landlord its a different ball game the liability stops with you, that's why you use professionals who are fully insured



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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 8:55 am 
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yartin wrote:
Why do you single out electrical works as a DIY risk? Plumbing and building works have risks too.

There are thousands of houses in the UK with very old wiring and old fuse mains, do the insurers ask to rewire the house or refuse insurance?

As a landlord, you don't do DIY work when comes to risky jobs. There is no regulation yet in the rent sector regard electrics (there is for HMOs) apart from gas safety, smolke/fire alarms and EPC.

In your property, you are free what to do at your own risk. IMO.


Hi yartin. Yes, you are right. It always seems to be electrical work. It's just that I keep hearing about new regulations, something called Part P, and having to notify the authorities or get the work signed off. It's all very confusing. Thanks for your reply


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 8:57 am 
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Bob225 wrote:
there more risk with plumbing tbh, a pipe Bursting can make a home inhabitable and cause deadly mould, sewage is even worse

In laymen's terms, your allowed to kill your self, but not kill anyone else - most of it is common sense, If your a landlord its a different ball game the liability stops with you, that's why you use professionals who are fully insured


Yes, I've not done any plumbing DIY. Thanks for your reply.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 9:17 am 
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A contentious issue. Being qualifed doesn't guarantee competence and TBH anyone with reasonable DIY skills can do just as good a job. The usual issue is always 'legal' where liability is the biggest one. Insurance companies will use any excuse to not pay out so that's always going to be your deciding factor. If you took actual risk into account then the likelihood of your building burning down is miniscule and if you have confidence in the work you do maybe you can forgo insurance????

That last question is, of course, the killer. Personally I can rebuild my house (materials only) for £30k so could contemplate going the non insured route but .... do I??

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 10:20 am 
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Part P has been around since 2005 (13 odd years) so its hardly a new thing, regulations change all the time - just to move the goal posts

If you really want to get into the red tape take a look at document 7

https://www.gov.uk/government/publicati ... document-7



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PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:42 pm 
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kellys_eye wrote:
A contentious issue. Being qualifed doesn't guarantee competence and TBH anyone with reasonable DIY skills can do just as good a job. The usual issue is always 'legal' where liability is the biggest one. Insurance companies will use any excuse to not pay out so that's always going to be your deciding factor. If you took actual risk into account then the likelihood of your building burning down is miniscule and if you have confidence in the work you do maybe you can forgo insurance????

That last question is, of course, the killer. Personally I can rebuild my house (materials only) for £30k so could contemplate going the non insured route but .... do I??


Great. You can re-build mine for £30k.It sounds so cheap, and it is, but that's partly because DIYers don't put a price on their time. I've spent the last four years constructing a large garden from scratch. The materials turned out to be much more expensive than I'd estimated, but if I took account of the labour time, say at £10 an hour. I dread to think how much it would cost.Cheers


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