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PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2015 2:13 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
Wild95 wrote:
All apprenticeships if been looking at are 3 years like joinery or pluming 3 years but multi skills is two year then a year of one thing so say joinery

Joinery, or more correctly carpentry and joinery used to be 4 or 5 years, followed by at least a year as an improver or journeyman before you were considered "fit for purpose". Even then you spent years building up a toolkit and gaining the experience needed to be a competent tradesman. I often work with guys who've done 2 years at college with limited time on site and then in the same environment (e.g. new house builds, etc) and when it comes to doing anything even remotely complex, or involving hardwoods, or removing/renovating older stuff they are often absolutely flummoxed by the job, or don't have the tool kit, or both. Sorry if that doesn't sound positive, but that's how I feel about my chosen trade (joiner)

Cheers for your comment :) so what do u think would be the best thing to do then?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:15 am 
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Wild95 wrote:
Cheers for your comment :) so what do u think would be the best thing to do then?

If you are any good at it I'd start out with flat pack assembly. All it normally requires is a set of screwdrivers, some decent Allen keys (the supplied ones are generally rubbish), a rubber mallet, a hammer, small spirit level, etc. Ideally you also need to be able to strap stuff to the walls for safety (e.g. kids bunk beds, wardrobes, etc) so a cordless combi drill (or better IMHO an SDS and a drill driver) would be of use. That gets you started with a minimal toolkit. Add kit and take on new stuff as and when funds allow - it helps you gain experience in the smaller stuff if you have a "home project" (i.e. a house refurb of your own, or parents/siblings/friends houses) to learn on. Read as many articles and books as you can get hold of - but NOT American ones because their practices are often contrary to the building regs here. In my experience a lot of domestic stuff is fairly small scale and really not what a trade carpenter would be interested in, e.g. put up shelves, assemble flatpack, etc. Where "handymen" often come unstuck is when they try to do stuff which is way beyond their experience/toolkit/understanding, such as fitting new front doors in old (warped) frames, etc. or building a stud wall in line with joists (so unsupported) or a repairing a roof or installing a Velux window and the like - you only have to watch that bald p*ll*** Dominic Littlewood to see some prime examples of where people have clearly gone past their limits of skill/experience/knowledge.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:27 am 
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J&K makes some good points there. I am not a handyman but I do help out the family and neighbours. Older people are going to be the target audience I would say and the sorts of jobs they need doing are ones that are either normal day to day things that they can't do themselves any more (changing awkward lightbulbs, tidying gardens, scrubbing decking etc) and also the jobs that are too small for a proper tradesman, replacing a broken tile or some loose grouting, painting a small bit of render or a garage door, re- setting a wobbly patio slab or replacing that stuff squeaky door hinge with the loose screws. These are just the kind of jobs that I would take for granted and are part of the usual weekend routine, but for elderly, disabled or those with limited skills/tools they can be very scary or just down right impossible for them to tackle. Case in point, the living room light fixture at my mothers house has an awkward glass shade that needs removing before bulbs can be changed, my mother is not that old but she cannot remove the shade herself, a step ladder is required as well as a good bit of strength and careful handling to take it off. If she didn't have me to do it then a handyman would be her choice.



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 11:43 pm 
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Thanks everyone for your comments iv applied for plumbing joinery and multi skills apprenticeships so witch ever comes first I'll do lol but my college has sent my cv of to our local council for multi skills the person said its to help on new building geting build said If I got the apprentiship the things I'd be doing are fitting Kitchens tiling plastering painting hanging doors doing bits and bobs in pluming so hopefully I get that one its a 3 year apprentiship then 4 year contract for a job witch they said be better pay better and bigger jobs to do now all I need to do now is save up and buy some tools of my own before o get shite pay lol thanks everyone for our comments and your time


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2015 1:24 am 
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do not spend any time or money on anticipated riches in the public sector more than say six months away
there are swinging draconian cuts in public services to come as the dogmatic government will slash at a frightening rate rather than a controlled sensible reduction avoiding the recession that some are about to face for the third time without a break

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