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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:53 pm 
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Handyman in Sussex wrote:
Job and Knock wrote:
But what, pray are "Beaver bits"? :dunno:

These:

http://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-stubby- ... 0wodZOgFaQ

More part of a plumbers and sparks tool kit, but they don't half drill out for a tube latch or mortice lock quickly, especially in an impact driver! ... Naughty I know

Ahhh! I think I'd be more inclined to suggest auger bits in 16, 19 and 22mm sizes for a starter as mortise lock bodies are often quite deep. In any case I think that starting-out with a set of spade bits then adding other stuff as needs/finances allowv would be the way to go, surely?

Grendel wrote:
I carry a jack plane and one I'd recommend to carry is a rebate plane lost count of the times that has proved invaluable . The other tool you haven't mentioned and one I'd not be without is an axe. Again such a useful tool for roofing , scribbing , shaping , defrazzing and I've even eased doors with mine.

I understand where you are coming from, here. I. too, carry a jack plan and a rebate plane, although in my case that is really a Clifton 3110 (or 3-in-1) plane which is occasionally very useful, but rarely on new builds or installs. Maybe for later kit additions? The axe is another one of those "throwback" tools - great for chopping out wedges in traditional work, for example, but again not something much done in new build. Similarly we no longer do roofing other than installing rafters or trusses from time to time - the rest is now a separate trade as far as we are concerned

Handyman in Sussex wrote:
J&K What is a Clubbyt?

Read "clubby" - dyslexic fingers, I'm afraid - a "clubby" is a club hammer, and nothing to do with members of the opposite sex........... :oops:

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OK, I'm an "old school" chippie, so please don't ask me to do a bodge job - I didn't bring my horse today and in any case you don't seem to have a hitching rail!


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 6:10 pm 
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Ah that's boring, I prefer the other definition!

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:45 pm 
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Job and Knock wrote:
Grendel wrote:
I carry a jack plane and one I'd recommend to carry is a rebate plane lost count of the times that has proved invaluable . The other tool you haven't mentioned and one I'd not be without is an axe. Again such a useful tool for roofing , scribbing , shaping , defrazzing and I've even eased doors with mine.

I understand where you are coming from, here. I. too, carry a jack plan and a rebate plane, although in my case that is really a Clifton 3110 (or 3-in-1) plane which is occasionally very useful, but rarely on new builds or installs. Maybe for later kit additions? The axe is another one of those "throwback" tools - great for chopping out wedges in traditional work, for example, but again not something much done in new build. Similarly we no longer do roofing other than installing rafters or trusses from time to time - the rest is now a separate trade as far as we are concerned


I'd agree that the type of work dictates the tools. I was probably lucky or maybe unlucky that the firm I served my time with and worked for many years tended to treat us joiners as glorified handymen at times and we were asked to do almost anything. Biggest part of my work has been in restoration or working on exsisting buildings where things are more often than not out of level or plumb and a rebate plane is very useful. I've also done an awful lot of lead gutter work and found an axe to be quicker , easier and much more versatile than any power tool. Incidentally I used to carry a rip saw too although that has found itself left at home more nowadays. A decade or so ago the storeman of the firm I worked for searched for a hardpoint version but it seems such a thing isn't made.
Job and Knock wrote:
Handyman in Sussex wrote:
J&K What is a Clubbyt?

Read "clubby" - dyslexic fingers, I'm afraid - a "clubby" is a club hammer,


Club hammer , always called them lump hammers probably because they are in effect just a lump of steel on a handle :thumbleft:


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:52 pm 
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Club hammer for me. I always thought of "lump hammer" as a rusty old thing to break the coal up in the coal house! :lol:

I think you could add lots of stuff to the list, but isn't this a of "bare minimum to allow you to work alone properly" type list.
The other thing with site work is that there's always a good chance of somebody half-inching stuff, so in some ways the less the better I suppose.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:59 pm 
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I always remember building up my first set of tools . Brought a brand new shiny sliding bevel and it grew legs very quickly. Not buying another just to see it disappear like the first I made a replacement out of some stainless sheet and hardwood. That must have been '81 or '82 and I still have it now.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:07 pm 
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Another story that springs to mind is an incident on a site one day. Young lad in his twenties came into the room and nearly stepped on a tool bag . He looked down at the scant contents and worn and apparently scruffy tools and said ( Scottish accent) " who left the bag of shite here?" only to be answered by the old boy we were working with . His tools may have been less than pristine but his work was superb and it left our young friend a little embarrassed till we all had a good laugh about it.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:10 pm 
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Yes, most of my original kit has either "walked" worn out, or been lost over the years. What i do remember is how expensive tools were relative to income back then in the early 70s.
Can't actually remember prices now, but I know that a quid didn't go far with decent small hand tools, and that must be £20 today.



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:28 pm 
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When I started we used to get 47p per week "tool money" , marked down on the payslips as that. It would be when my gross was around £35 a week as an apprentice in the early '80's. I'm not sure when it was dropped , probably late '80's as I can remember still getting it after I had served my time although it never went up.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 8:43 pm 
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Grendel wrote:
I always remember building up my first set of tools . Brought a brand new shiny sliding bevel and it grew legs very quickly. Not buying another just to see it disappear like the first I made a replacement out of some stainless sheet and hardwood. That must have been '81 or '82 and I still have it now.


I've got three sliding bevels - one Rosewood and one Ebony which both date from the 1800's and need a screwdriver for adjustment.

My other one started life as a plastic Stanley jobbie, it broke and was chucked in the skip by a youngster.

I rescued it and fitted an Oak handle and it became my third bevel.

I'd always wanted one like the Stanley with a lever cam action, but soon discovered that they are a pita as the lever is often in the way. :lol:

@ Dave54 - don't get me started on the price of tools now and then. :shock:

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 9:06 pm 
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Grendel wrote:
When I started we used to get 47p per week "tool money" , marked down on the payslips as that. It would be when my gross was around £35 a week as an apprentice in the early '80's. I'm not sure when it was dropped , probably late '80's as I can remember still getting it after I had served my time although it never went up.

Yeah I remember that and I also remember how much it was in the early 90's. It was 1.98 per week we got for tool allowance and it never went up as long as I was ever books in up until the mid to late 90's
I remember those days well,time and a half on Saturday mornings then double time and double time on a Sunday. Travel time paid at your hourly rate and a production bonus every week if you worked hard enough. Those days are long gone!!


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:33 am 
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Firstly sorry to J&K if we're going off track a little. We had similar payments. Obviously the hours we worked and again like you time and a half till Saturday lunch and double after that although at some point they changed that to double for the whole weekend. I was also on time and a third for one job which involved working evenings and part of the night on bank work. They would shut and we would move in , work , clear up and they would reopen the following morning. We had a "standing bonus" for want of a better term which might go up but never fell. Travel was paid on a mileage rate and was nowhere as generous as yours. We got so much per mile , measured in a straight line from the yard , one way and the first five or six miles didn't count. When I first started the limit for travelling was supposedly sixty miles after that it was meant to be lodging but the job I was on after block release was sixty five and because it was only just past the limit we travelled . That limit got pushed a little further each job until travelling a hundred miles to a job wasn't unknown. When lodging digs were paid for and they gave us a meal allowance of £40 per week but of course only one travelling payment so working away overtime was pretty much obligatory.
We , or some of us got an expenses payment depending on how far we lived from the yard and some of us went home in the vans.
One other payment we got was something called "joint board supplement" which I was always told we got because our wages weren't that good. Again like the tool money I'm not sure when it disappeared.
Now just to get this back on track a little at least with regards to tools , we did have some supplied. All power tools were supplied and on top of that saws , drill bits , hacksaw blades and sometimes the hacksaw itself , files , lump (or club) hammers and replacement handles but no other hammers , and with a bit of persistence it was possible to get things like spanners , scrapers and glass cutters.
Ayjay, I also have three bevels . The one I made , stainless and hardwood and having a wing nut , another with a rosewood handle and secured by use of a screwdriver and another smaller all steel one which also has a small wing nut . I did at one point make a large one with a blade that must of been eighteen inches long out of beech but I seem to recall giving it away , either way I don't have it now.


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