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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:54 pm 
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So I assume you have a basic toolkit and are looking at what you "might" need once you are up and running...

Probably better to come at it from the other way, as the jobs start coming in is there additional kit you need ??

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 6:09 pm 
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Kev888 wrote:
Those seem to be the things that sway the argument for me too; even if I got lots of batteries the grunt available could still be limiting and (whilst better than mains voltage) I'd expect water to be more of a problem.

Maybe with decent water-proofing it won't be long before batteries evolve enough to do the job. Perhaps they already have with the 54v dewalt ones but either way they're too new/costly for me, and not many machines take advantage of them yet. For now petrol seems a better bet, certainly for the mower.

I 'may' still go for 18v or 36v for hedge trimmers etc., not sure. Petrol would still be better in some ways, but the tiny engines needed seem unreliable unless you go for quite costly ones.


Personally, I've found that if you get half decent kit like this, and treat it right, then it's reliable. You want something you can get spares for as well, in the future as well as now.
"Cheap" for any sort of commercial work is nearly always a mistake. Whatever it is.
The thing with petrol is you have a virtually unlimited run time.
As already said you would find jobs with big areas to work on at some time.

But as wine~o says, the time to get new kit is when you know exactly what you need.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:15 pm 
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Not sure if I'm missing a link there but yes, that makes complete sense. Having looked around at reviews, the cheaper/domestic options (especially for longer-reach trimmers) are pretty unreliable or short lived even for their intended use - and the people reviewing them probably cut a hedge only once or twice a year!

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 8:15 pm 
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wine~o wrote:
So I assume you have a basic toolkit and are looking at what you "might" need once you are up and running...
Probably better to come at it from the other way, as the jobs start coming in is there additional kit you need ??
Kind of, though I'm pleased to say this is fairly minimal as I'm not badly off for tools in general; aside from costly/specialist things, there isn't much in the way of routine stuff that I've not got. Some are a little old and worn by now, but are generally of reasonable quality so should do fine without much up-front investment.

Though some are corded. I assume thats okay for indoor use where sockets will be available (though maybe I should PAT them). It just seemed inappropriate for garden work, what with rain, long trailing leads and in some cases needing people to be in.

But the reason for thinking ahead is that my batteries are getting past it and I'll need to buy at least some new ones of those up-front. If there had been probability of sharing them with garden tools I may have made different decisions, possibly even swapped brand. It seems thats not going to be the case though, if engines are still the way to go, and also that I may not want to offer inexpert garden labour anyway.

So this thread has (yet again) been very helpful!
Kev

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 4:00 pm 
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as an aside ryobi now seem to do a 3 year gtee now although there 4 and 5ah batteries are more expensive than say dewalt with 4ah dewalts being around £11 per ah compared to ryobi at around £15 per ah
this is the cheapest way to get a starter kit with 2x4ah batteries often sold for £148-£160 at varying times in the year
https://www.diy.com/departments/ryobi-o ... 421_BQ.prd
https://uk.ryobitools.eu/newsletters/20 ... s-no-fuss/

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:29 pm 
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Yes its odd that ryobi batteries cost more. My main stuff is dewalt now, but in ryobi ive still got an old (blue) 18v circular saw and a newer (green) sds drill which i've not yet replaced with dewalt eqivalents. Sadly the ryobi batteries are dead and I'm reluctant to replace them just for those two tools. TBH the sds drill isn't especially good so no great loss, but i miss the saw sometimes.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:55 pm 
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if your talking new dewalt the new 18/54v batteries fit the slide on tools opening up your avenues for some impressive powerful tools :lol:
although the 18/54v 6ah battery at £88 is about the same as 2x 18v 4ah batteries

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:00 pm 
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how old where the ryobi batteries assuming you got them before the drill ??

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:00 am 
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Yes the dual voltage batteries are very potential, though could be reaching the point where they are excessive for some things. I abandoned smaller voltages when Li-ions became so small and light, but a 9ah or even 6ah is still reasonably big. Tempting for future-proofing though, and perhaps less to faff around with than charging/carrying multiple smaller ones; in most circumstances, a single 6ah would easily last me all day for drilling or driving.

I can't recall exactly how old my ryobi batteries are. The dewalts are about 4years or so and their capacity is much less than it was, at a rough guess perhaps around a half. The ryobi batteries are older, and were getting pretty poor so haven't been used for a while now.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:37 am 
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Dewalt are just releasing the 54v mower,apparently it can cut 1/4 of an acre on one charge. It’ll cost probably a lot more than a lower branded petrol mower.
I’d buy a 2nd hand good quality petrol mower tbh.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:45 am 
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with dewalt at the min with most flexvolt you get a free 6ah battery which can balance out the extra cost over pure 18v batteries
a 5 year old battery can be around 50% down on power and amps so a new high draw tool can seem poor unless tried on a new battery

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:31 pm 
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Thanks, I shall have to look at what offers are on. There isn't very much advantage to me at the moment of the 6Ah flexivolt batteries over the 5ah 18v ones, but if 54v tools become more common and cheaper during the battery's lifetime (which seems likely) then the compatibility of batteries and chargers could be worth having.

The 6Ah flexivolts look to be around a third more costly per ampere-hour (than the 5ah 18v ones) 'if' bought by themselves. Currently the 9ah ones are disproportionately costly, and IMO less suitable for sharing with normal drills, drivers etc. (so 2x 6ah for the same price seems a better bet). But as you say, the combo-deals available could make all the difference, I wouldn't be surprised if the 6Ah ones turn out to be quite a reasonable choice.

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Last edited by Kev888 on Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:32 pm 
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steviejoiner74 wrote:
Dewalt are just releasing the 54v mower,apparently it can cut 1/4 of an acre on one charge. It’ll cost probably a lot more than a lower branded petrol mower.
I’d buy a 2nd hand good quality petrol mower tbh.
Ah, thanks - I noticed many/most retailers were out of stock of the old model mower, this is probably why.

Seems like the technology is getting there, then. Though I agree, (compared to petrol) no doubt it will be too costly for my modest needs at the moment - even if the batteries were shared with other tools. But maybe by the next time I buy a mower, 54v may well be the thing.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:27 pm 
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the 5ah are overpriced in general you can tend to get 6x4ah[24ah] for the same cost or less than 4x5ah [20ah]
i always go for value for money edging on maximum capacity but i am not reliant on batteries at all as workshop based but far prefer the cableless choice as worth the flexability :lol:
indeed i am such a tart i have more battery tools than brain cells :lol:

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:00 am 
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Kev888 wrote:
Yes its odd that ryobi batteries cost more. My main stuff is dewalt now, but in ryobi ive still got an old (blue) 18v circular saw and a newer (green) sds drill which i've not yet replaced with dewalt eqivalents. Sadly the ryobi batteries are dead and I'm reluctant to replace them just for those two tools. TBH the sds drill isn't especially good so no great loss, but i miss the saw sometimes.

ok a bit confused here ??
do you have a ryobi sds or another tool that needs attention ??
if you are board with the sds what would you want for it :dunno:
just thinking to try it with a new battery for a fair trial

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