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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 1:06 pm 
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Hi peeps,

Apologies if this has been answered before, but I've been unable to find a specific answer to this problem.

Replacing my crappy electric hob with a gas one. The electric hob and electric oven were connected to a spur beneath the counter, which goes to a cooker isolator switch that's on a separate 32A fuse on the consumer unit.

There is no 13A outlet for the gas hob ignition below the counter. The gas hob does not come wired. It's manual calls for a minimum .75mm flex. The label on the hob says it pulls 1W.... which is a quarter of an amp or similar...?

From what I've read - lots of people advise installing a second cooker switch/13A plug socket beneath the counter so that the hob ignition can safely be plugged into an adequately fused spur....

In my case this isn't overly easy, because the spur that's been installed is a single unit, and a double would require cutting the plaster. To my mind, the extra-cooker-switch concept doesn't make that much sense either, as it's not accessible when below the counter.

My question: Is there a reason that I just wire the hob ignition directly into the (isolatable) electric oven hob, as long as a put an adequate inline fuse (around 5A) on the cable?

My understanding is: the fuse protects the flex from the load if something goes wrong. Just because the larger cooker circuit has the capacity to deliver more power, doesn't mean the ignition circuit will take that power..... the ignition circuit will take what it needs from the domestic supply, which can be isolated from above the counter along with the cooker.


Thanks in advance if I'm screaming nonsense!

Ren



Ps. Nudes on request ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:37 pm 
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Made me look :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:08 pm 
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Swap the outlet plate for a fused connection unit with a 3 A fuse.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:49 pm 
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wine~o wrote:
Swap the outlet plate for a fused connection unit with a 3 A fuse.



I still need the outlet to power the electric oven. Therein lies the problem!

Having now checked, the oven needs a 13A supply.... so my 32A supply was put in place to allow for the nasty electric hob and the oven.... which is probably bad practice?

Seems I should also change the isolation switch above the counter to 13A (either at the consumer unit or in the switch itself if possible)

I still only have a single place to wire the two devices.... and it still seems that the hob requires a much smaller fuse (3A). Do you guys think it can be an inline fuse? Do they even exist!? (I've lived on canal boats for years, so I'm more used to DC systems)

Cheers!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 9:18 pm 
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In practice, I'd probably use a 13amp FCU for both and perhaps a heavier [than specified] flex for the hob supply.

If you want to be Ultra cautious, then you could use two MK Grid Fuse Units. One at 13amp and the other at 3amp. However, I'm not sure if the Grid Switch system does a 'cable out' face plate with wire restraints but, dependent upon where such is located, is there any possibility of any strain on the wiring?

If I understand the situation correctly, both these Fuse Units could be isolated from the 'above counter' FCU should they need to be isolated.



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 1:11 am 
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Thanks to Grumps.

I'd happily attach both to a 13A FCU. I suppose using a heavier than spec. cable for the hob eliminates the need for two different ratings on the fuses?

Cheers


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