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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 4:35 pm 
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Hi I'm new to the forum and hope I'm posting in the right place.

I want to build a wall of bookshelves around the window of my new babies room. I would prefer it to go floor to ceiling and tight against both walls, but I'm having trouble working out how to join 2 horizontal at the same point (hopefully the sketch will make some sense) I was gonna use dowels to connect the horizontals to uprights then fix on top but obviously this would mean putting together then putting in place and there is no room. I'm a bit stumped now. Any advice much appreciated. I plan to use 1 1/4 x 9 " wood as we want it chunky looking and would rather not use visible battens. I've made some cabinets and quite a good woodworker just can't get my head round this one (baby brain maybe)

Thanks kate x


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:18 pm 
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I do not want to pee on your bonfire but I am not sure that is a good idea. The radiator works on convected heat mostly and there appears to be little allowance for air circulation in your proposed shelving unit. The picture rail will either have to be scribed or removed to get a flush fit.

I must admit that, even though I could make the units easily, I would look at Ikea units for cheapness and simplicity. A number of these nice clean white units assembled would work well in the space. See http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/products/stor ... -80275887/ Additionally you can buy boxes and drawers that fit the square to gibe you maximum usage ( see lower down the link)

Ikea's stuff has come a long way since the wobbly melamine units of the past and this idea is certainly worth thinking about.

DWD


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:40 pm 
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I agree with DWD, but if you want to make it yourself, I'd leave the shelf out above the radiator. The timber will need to be kept indoors "in stick" for some time before it is worked. Personally I'd get decent softwood from a good timber supplier to make it. not the stuff from the DIY sheds or a builder's merchant.
To start off with don't make it a dead fit. You'll never get it in. Make it narrower and use a fillet either side that is easy to scribe in.
You could probably put it together in situ by using screws and a "pocket" hole jig. Or you could make it in three parts, make the inner two vertical sides half thickness so they can be screwed or bolted together, and slightly narrower front to back to accommodate a top to bottom batten pinned and glued, or screwed onto the front edge to cover the join.
Whatever you do make sure the shelves are fixed back properly to the wall. Fixed to something solid too, not plasterboard fixings. It needs to be fixed back strongly enough, and the structure needs to be strong enough, so that it can't be pulled over by kids climbing etc.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:44 pm 
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Yes, the Ikea units have wall brackets that come with it. I put some of these up in my grandchildrens rooms. I was surprised how good they are for the price which is why I am recommending them. :thumbright:

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:50 pm 
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if you want to build it with softwood as per your design, then make it as 4 cupboards:

2 tall carcases, 1xL/H and 1xR/H ignoring middle section.

Then make up 2 more carcases, each with a top, bot and sides.

Yes you will double up the verticals where they meet at top and bottom, but at least it can be assembled.

Dont attempt to make it tight to the walls -make it about 20mm narrower, fit it in place then scribe some cover trims to cover the gaps to the walls. If you make it short of the top you could do the same to the top.

Alternatively make the unit 60mm narrower and then you wont have to remove the skirting and picture rail, just scribe around (somewhat easier said than done though).

Although expensive, solid pine board available on ebay is much more stable to work than solid pine boards

Nothwithstanding comments above regarding radiator!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:50 pm 
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Thank you everyone for your replies. I really don't want to use premise bookshelves, I know these can be a great solution sometimes but we are after a more rugged look, like my other sons bedroom (pic) I would think using 38mm timber would overcome the warping, no?

Thanks Dave54 and notch1- I like the idea of making the two side section first, I think this will work for me. No worries removing picture rail and half the skirting gone anyway. Will definitely secure well to the wall to protect the little monkeys.

Thanks x


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:30 pm 
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So you're going for the Fatface look :-)

Being thicker wont stop warping, the timber will cup -as long as you dont mind a bit of movement. For a rustic look a bit of movement wont spoil the look.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:32 pm 
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Dave54 wrote:
You could probably put it together in situ by using screws and a "pocket" hole jig. Or you could make it in three parts, make the inner two vertical sides half thickness so they can be screwed or bolted together, and slightly narrower front to back to accommodate a top to bottom batten pinned and glued, or screwed onto the front edge to cover the join.

Not so sure I'd ever recommend pocket holes for use as book shelves. Probably better to through drill and use long dowels to support two shelves, one either side of the upright. Glued dowels are a lot more ridgid and stronger than pocket hole screws whilst the jigs to drill them can be homemmade very cheaply. That way with, say, 18mm stock, 50mm long dowels (8mm diameter) could be used to support the shelves and fit into 18mm deep holes. I do agree with the idea of having moveable shelves, with the ideal way to achieve that being to usie Tonk strips, which require a router and a specialist cutter.

My own idea for making a tight fitting unit would be to build a separate plinth of 3 x 2in softwood which could be levelled up and the main part of the carcass fixed on top. By doing that it should be possible to get very close to the ceiling.

Comments about radiator shelves - I'm with the rest of the guys, there. Don't do it, especially with solid wood

Kate84 wrote:
I would think using 38mm timber would overcome the warping, no?

Ability to overcome warping has absolutely nothing to do with warping - I've seen 9 x 3s which were bowed and twisted badly because they hadn't been sesoned properly. The average scaffolding plank is typically cupped, bowed and/or twisted aftera few minths use to some degree or another

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 7:38 am 
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I also can't help but notice that on the drawing it says "sawn timber' . Is that referring to the sizes you have available prior to planing or that you intend to build the bookcases with sawn timber? That might be ok in a shed for storing garden shears and half tins of old paint but not really suitable for bookcases or furniture in a small child's room in my humble opinion.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:22 am 
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Job and Knock wrote:
Not so sure I'd ever recommend pocket holes for use as book shelves. Probably better to through drill and use long dowels to support two shelves, one either side of the upright. Glued dowels are a lot more ridgid and stronger than pocket hole screws whilst the jigs to drill them can be homemmade very cheaply. That way with, say, 18mm stock, 50mm long dowels (8mm diameter) could be used to support the shelves and fit into 18mm deep holes.


You're right of course J & K. I was trying to think of a simple way of building "in situ" Dowels will be much stronger.

I'd wondered about the "sawn" thing as well Grendel.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:46 pm 
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Grendel wrote:
I also can't help but notice that on the drawing it says "sawn timber' . Is that referring to the sizes you have available prior to planing or that you intend to build the bookcases with sawn timber? That might be ok in a shed for storing garden shears and half tins of old paint but not really suitable for bookcases or furniture in a small child's room in my humble opinion.

A few years back there was, maybe still is, a fad for the rough sawn look in posh-ish pubs and restaurants. We did this by starting out with the most gawd-awful, rough band sawn rubbish you could imaging which was really splintery, then by judicioius belt sanding it was possible to retain the surface textures whilst having a smooth-enough surface for the clients not to pick-up any timbers if they ran their hands across it. There is a bit of a knack to doing it right - on more than a couple of jobs they initially gave the task to the labourers (time-served joiners being "too expensive" for such a "menial" task) who either returned perfectly smooth, but very thiin timber, or stuff which was so rough that it would lacerate all but the toughest of hands. So, as I said, there is a knack to sanding just enough, but to anyone with half a brain and a bit of an eye for detail it shouldn't be that difficult to do. Finishing with a water-based stain (to raise the grain) then cutting back with flour paper (220 grit alox or above) looks even more effective if the right shades of brown are used. The task, though, is very noisy and dusty so a dust mask, ear plugs and bags of patience (did I mention it was as boring as hell?) are all musts. Having done my share, I wouldn't want it in my house, but then my favourite style is Art Deco and that is an acquired taste as well

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:07 pm 
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Yes done similar , on floorboards in some cases to blend new with old , belt sander and the old chains in a bag followed by staining. I know the stuff you mention and while I suppose it does have a certain rustic charm I always think it looks overly rough and rustic . In my eyes a truly rustic look should show bladed tool marks from axes , adze , or planes which ironically is now a difficult and expensive route to take as there are fewer and fewer people who are able to produce a decent tooled finish.
I know what you mean about Art Deco being an acquired taste. I really like it now and have done for some time but can remember thinking in my teens what horrible garish crap it was.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:06 am 
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That should have said some tool marks , minimal if you like , not the waves of the ocean "adzing" that also seemed to become popular in pubs at one time.
Off topic but I couldn't edit the former post but could edit this one . Is that because I had logged out in between?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:09 am 
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Editing is time limited I think. If someone posts after you have submitted you can still update your post in the editing period but it will display a message that you have edited the original. :thumbright:

I often have to edit if I have done a reply on my phone as it is usually littered with spelling typos with my sausage fingers on the poxy phone's keyboard display thingy. :lol:

DWD


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:11 am 
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Grendel wrote:
Off topic but I couldn't edit the former post but could edit this one . Is that because I had logged out in between?


Istr that there's a time limit on editing posts - that's common on many forums - it stops thing being changed in such a way that they no longer make sense after further posts have been made.

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