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 Post subject: 240v Electric Drill
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:54 pm 
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I am tired of my lousy Ryobi Battery Drill and Battery Angle Grinder dying on me at the wrong time so I've decided I need a corded 240V pair as well.
For the angle grinder I'm getting:
DEWALT DWE490-GB 2000W 9" ANGLE GRINDER 240V

However when I look for a corded Electric drill literally every single search result keep giving me stuff that looks like an SDS drill???? I already have a corded SDS drill.

I just want the corded version of this: DEWALT XR CORDLESS 18V 1.3AH LI-ION COMBI DRILL 1 BATTERY DCD776C1-GB


like in 1:05 of this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12WfvcG55p0


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 Post subject: Re: 240v Electric Drill
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 5:05 pm 
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https://www.mytoolshed.co.uk/dewalt-d02 ... -240v.html
https://www.mytoolshed.co.uk/dewalt-d02 ... -240v.html
710watt, trigger hold down button, hammer action, pressure sensitive switch for slow starting, chuck needs a key, not sure if its 2 speed

https://www.amazon.co.uk/DEWALT-DWD014S ... B003LS497S
chuckless, single speed, light weight,


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 Post subject: Re: 240v Electric Drill
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 6:44 pm 
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What's the point in having multiple speeds? Is it better?


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 Post subject: Re: 240v Electric Drill
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 8:53 am 
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Jumanji95 wrote:
However when I look for a corded Electric drill literally every single search result keep giving me stuff that looks like an SDS drill???? I already have a corded SDS drill.

It's because two-speed (mechanical gearbox) drills these days invariably feature a mechanical impact drilling mechanism, making them look a lot like an SDS drill, however if you look carefully at the chuck and the maximum speed of the drill you'll find that an impact (percussion) drill generally has a 3-jaw chuck (although keyless chucks are not unknown) as opposed to an SDS-style chuck (which only accommodates SDS drills) and it invariably has a far higher speed in top gear )often 2000 to 3000rpm as opposed to 800 to 1200rpm for the SDS). An SDS drill is far more efficient at drilling masonry, not to mention quieter whilst an impact (percussion) drill is better for drilling a wide variety of materials, including masonry, but on masonry the impact strength is way lower than even a small SDS making progress, in comparison, relatively slow and noisy

Jumanji95 wrote:
What's the point in having multiple speeds? Is it better?

Better? Yes! The lower speed range is used with large diameter bits which require greater torque whereas the higher speed range is for smaller diameter bits which require high speed but low torque. Examples of low speed drilling: large diameter auger bits (25mm and above) in wood, large diameter twist bits (10mm and above) in steel, etc. Examples of high speed drilling: small diameter brad point bits (say 6, 8, 10mm) in wood (for dowelling), small diameter twist bits (below 10mm) in metal. Different drill bits and different sizes of bits have widely varying speed requirements - run a large diameter tool steel twist drill in metal at too high a speed and it will overheat and loose temper, a large diameter auger bit at too hih a speed may catch and cause injury, a small diameter twist drill in a soft metal such as aluminium will possibly catch and snap if run too slowly. It's a case of horses for courses

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